Friday, December 24, 2010

message

Dear teokimhoe,



Jean and I would like to thank each and every one of you who have chosen to walk beside us on our shared journey with Parkinson’s. Your feedback is as inspiring and motivating for us as our stories are for you. It is what keeps us keepin’ on the darker days.

Your word of mouth support of pdplan4life has introduced people far and wide to our web site and the presentations we make at conferences around the country. We now have 30,000 visitors representing every state and 34 countries.

We couldn’t have achieved this success without you. As the New Year approaches, we raise our chocolate malts and toast to you and your families…

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

short breath muscle movement

Shortness of breath results from a combination of chest wall rigidity and abnormal, drug-induced muscle movement.

I have gone through CT Chest and Lung XR and confirmed I have short of breath caused by Parkinson's.

My medications daily are as follows:

9 dosages Prednisolone (Stiroid)
1 " Nexium 40mg (gastric)

Kindly comment

Regards

TEOKIMHOE

shortness of breath

Dear Doctor,

Just to be informed I have shortness of breath as shown in my CT Scan. Besides I have inflammation around the lungs.

Question:

Can shortness of breath lower your normal blood pressure or vice versa?

Shortness of breath causes less oxygen,dizziness,black out,unstable on foot,"drunken crowd"

Besides steriod for inflammation are any medication more effective?

Exercise relief you for shortness of breath,depression /anxiety vice versa

Merry christmas

LOrd bless

TEOKIMHOO

to help the PD patients aware the diseases and encourage to set up support groups to educate the patients and their immediate families
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#2 Dr. Okun

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19-January 07 LocationUniversity of Florida Posted Today, 11:30 AM

Please get better soon and our prayers are with you.

This is a PD only website so we will defer these questions to your general doctor.

You have asked before about shortness of breath and PD, and it can occur most commonly when wearing off PD medications.

Michael S. Okun, M.D.

Friday, December 17, 2010

Druken Crowd

Druken Crowd
Posted on December 17th, 2010 by heroteo
I think I may need to clarify my situation because the actual chain of events may not be clearly stated out in my last post.

There are three separate incidents prior to my experience of “drunken crowd”. Firstly, I went under a procedure called Procedure for Prolapse and Hemorrhoids to remove my piles. After the surgery, I noticed that my level of energy and movement were affected. During the surgical procedure, I was given an injection through my spine. After my surgical procedure, I consulted my Parkinson’s physician, who then substituted Sinemet with Stalevo as stated in my previous post. The following day, I went to my physiotherapist for heat treatment to my neck and upper body, because I suffer from stiffness of the neck. A heated cloth/mask was applied to my neck region. It was after the treatment, I suffered from “drunken crowd”.

Given the clarification above, I would be very helpful for your explanation on the following :-

(a) Is Stalevo been known to have side effects, particularly on the Comptan portion of it?

(b) By applying heat treatment to my neck region, could it have affected my nerves or affected the dopamine level in my brains?

Could Procedure for Prolapse and Hemorrhoi have caused my experience of “drunken crowd”?

Best regards

Teo Kim Hoo

Posted Today, 05:03 PM

Given that you worsened after a medication change you should contact your doctor. There are many potential reasons for worsening and it could be as simple as a dose issue, but it could also be a side effect. You need an in person look by someone who knows you.

Michael S. Okun, M.D.


Dear Doctor,

Just to be informed I have shortness of breath as shown in my CT Scan. Besides I have excess inflammation around the lungs.

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

stalevo

Recently my sinemet CR was substituted by my doctor with Stalevo 100gm.

My medication are Requip 4mg, sinement regular 4 , Stalevo 100 X 4 and 5 mg Jumax daily.I started with 1/2 Stalevo 100 three times daily and later was increased to 4 X 100mg on the third day.
.
I started "Druken Crowd" on the fourth days as I was light-headed,short of breath and unable to move steadily or stand up with my foot alone.

Luckly my wife was behind to support me by putting me in the moving trolley chair.

Questions:

Is it overdose?
Is Stalevo suitable for me?
Is it side effect on Stalevo and entacapone?


Kindly elaborate

Regard

TEOKIMHOE

to help the PD patients aware the diseases and encourage to set up support groups to educate the patients and their immediate families
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#2 Dr. Okun

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19-January 07 LocationUniversity of Florida Posted Today, 12:56 PM

Hard to say. Could be under-dosed, overdosed, or just that you don't do well with Comtan. You and your neurologist will need to carefully sort this out. Good luck.

Michael S. Okun, M.D.

Sunday, November 21, 2010

Not a" going *away disease

Parkinson's is a chronical neurogical illness i.e. not a going away" disease.

PD patients are different from what we define themself as "patient" i.e only during acute, self-limited illness or injury that temporarily impact their lives as an inconvenience or comfort.

The major functions of muscles are to produce movements of the body, to maintain the position of the body against the force of gravity,to produce movements of structures inside the body, and to alter pressures or tensions of structures in the body.

The symptoms of muscles disorders are as follows:


'1. Bradykinesia i.e. slowness of movement


2. Resting tremor i.e shaking,either one or both side


3. Rigidity i.e. marked stiffness


4.Decreased arm wing on one or both side


5. Problems with walking and balance i.e. freezing being unable to initiate a step forward


6. Small, cramped handwriting


7. Masked face ie. reduced facial expression


8. Low voice i.e not clear


Therefore PD patients have to choose an exercises that gets their muscles moving i.e stretching, in order to overcome the muscles stiffness, rigidity and slow movement.


A physiotherapy, doctor or personal trainer my be consulted as how to start on an exercise routine that encourages flexibilty, improves stamina and helps to maintain balance.


There is some evidence that tai chi and yoga help maintain flexibility and improve posture.

stoop posture

Being a person suffering from Parkinson's Disease (PD), I notice other PD patients, including myself, suffer from a stooped posture, particularly while walking.


I would like to share with you my experience in the causation of the posture suffered by most, if not all PD sufferers.


I notice that my muscles surrounding my shoulders right down to my arms, are generally very stiff. Because of the stiffness in the said muscles, I have difficulty in swinging my arms when I walk. The swinging of the arms on opposite sides of your limbs, i.e. you swing your right hand when you walk with your left foot and vice versa, during walking gives us the counterbalance required to maintain a correct posture while walking.


Due to the lack of arm motion due to the stiffness of the muscles in the shoulder region, the body will naturally be off balance. To compensate for the lack of balance, I find myself exagerating the arm swinging movement, in that I need to push hard with my shoulder to swing the hands forward and backward.


This in turn lead to the muscles in the shoulders and upper back to tense up. This result in the body having to stoop forward to maintain the balance of the body during walking.

low blood pressure

I am taking Lavodopa,Carbidopa and dopamin agonist for two year Close monitoring is required for people with certain medical condition. After I have a minor stroke (T.I.A) recently, I experience two different blood pressure i.e. decreased blood pressure when rising from a seated position or lie-down on bed after lengths of times. I feel dizziness on standing,headache or fainting. My mouth run dry and thirsty Insomnia, anxiey, and fatigue, malaise..

I usually have 145/76 normal blood level for the past two years .
Recently I have low blood pressure which is below 100/60 standing after rising up from sitting or lie-down on bed.

It causes me feeling dizzness, and vision blurring.
I understand the syndromes can vary from person to person

Normal blood pressure is regulated by specific reflexes in the nervous system. Parkinson's disease can impair this reflex mechanism and result in lowered blood pressure.Low blood pressure usually presents itself as side-effect of anti parkinson's medications. Levodopa -carbidopa, dopamine agonists and other antidepressions and sleeping medications may potentiate a hypotensive event

Thursday, November 18, 2010

The shy dragger disease and shy dragger syndrome is a very rare disorder that greatly affects the control of the body’s automatic nervous system, which controls one’s blood pressure, vision bowel, heart rate and bladder functions.

The Shy Drager disease has a lot many features are same as Parkinson’s disease like slowness, muscle rigidity and poor balance. The disease Shy Drager symptoms also include very low blood pressure, dizziness and feeling very lightheaded. However, some individuals also have very high blood pressure when lying down. As the disease moves forward and progresses, other symptoms like bladder incontinence, slurred speech, constipation, having difficulty in swallowing anything and also not able to control emotions are also visible.

The Shy Drager disease normally occurs in people aged in the 50s and is more seen in men than women.

The reason why the disorder develops is still not known but the brain scan shows generalized shrinkage of the brain which controls the automated nervous system of a human’s body. No cause has yet been found.

The main difference between Shy dragger and Parkinson is the low blood pressure, which is the key to diagnosis.

Sky Drager is treated with medications which would increase blood pressure and other anti Parkinson drugs is also used. Also other treatment includes pacemaker to control slow heart rate, incontinence care and feeding tubes.

Majority of the individuals do not respond to drugs and the disease continues. A lot many people rapidly become disabled and have poor prognosis. Print | Post comment

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Parkinson’s Disease: Top 5 Symptoms

Parkinson’s Disease: Top 5 Symptoms
Tuesday, 16 Nov 2010 03:55 PM Article Font Size


Around five million people around the world suffer from Parkinson’s disease. In America alone, the number is around 1 million people. The disease generally occurs in people who are around sixty or older. Some sufferers can lead an extended and productive life while others degenerate more quickly.

The most fundamental of Parkinson’s disease symptoms affects both voluntary and involuntary functions and begins on one side of the body. The symptoms may be mild and subtle at first, and then gain momentum, turning aggressive and fully manifested. The top five symptoms to watch out for are:

1. Tremors. Tremors extend themselves to multiple body parts including the hands, fingers, jaws, legs, feet, head, and neck. The states of these tremors vary according to the level of stress or excitement that the person is under. They disappear with voluntary movement and sleep.

2. Stiffness. The second most well-known symptom of Parkinson’s is rigidity or stiffness of the limbs and trunk, increasing with the individual’s movement and locomotion. The stiffness can give rise to muscle pain and muscle cramps. The restriction of fine and relaxed muscle movements can prevent normal functioning like handwriting (micrographia) and eating


3. Slow movements. This symptom of Parkinson’s disease is also known as Bradykinesia. The individual, with the progression of the disease, finds it difficult to begin a particular motion and conclude the same movement. This symptom of Parkinson’s can also cause a lack of facial expression.

4. Instability. This affects the posture of individuals. They may have impaired reflexes and cannot remain balanced in one fixed position. The "Parkinson’s gait" is a distinctive walk in a shuffling and stooped manner.

5. Secondary symptoms. The most common secondary symptoms of Parkinson's are constipation, difficulty in swallowing, and depression. Additional Parkinson’s disease symptoms include excessive sweating and excessive salivation. Dementia, or loss of intellectual capabilities, occurs in the last stage of the disease’s progression.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

secret recipe behind the mask



I often smiled as I watched the video recording of my kick-boxing exercise which I have uploaded to YouTube a few weeks ago. My trainers and videographer told me the same thing – “You do not look like a Parkinson’s patient at all”. Even my doctor shook his head in disbelief and said, “This is shocking. I can’t imagine a 70-year-old Parkinson’s patient doing such a strenuous exercise such as kickboxing. I am sure that you are the only Parkinson’s patient in Malaysia who is doing the kickboxing exercise.” As early as 1998, I already had both the motor and non-motor symptoms. Since my diagnosis in 2002, I went through a period of depression, anxiety, denial and anger. Subsequently, I bounced back after discovering a secret recipe for fighting Parkinson’s, which consisted of: knowledge (is power), exercise, medications, nutrition / supplements and prayer. In my quest for knowledge, I browsed various Parkinson’s websites, raining them with questions, questions and questions. I even started the first Parkinson’s blog in Malaysia (www.heroteo.com). I tried to learn everything about Parkinson’s in order to overcome all complications - the Chinese heroes won their battles by understanding their enemies first. . Animal experiments showed that exercises may be neuroprotective. Rats which were forced to exercise had a lesser degree of brain damage after they were exposed to poison. In mice which were made to undergo treadmill exercises, there was increased production of dopamine. Parkinson’s patients are comparable to the car. The medications are needed to help patients to start walking, while fuel or battery is needed to help start the car engine. Exercises are needed to improve the patients’ physical mobility and endurance, while driving helps to recharge the battery. Thus, exercises help our “engines” warm up before leaving home and keep the “cars” going everyday. Even healthy people such as Bruce Lee, the Chinese kungfu master, know that exercises are beneficial. As such, since 2005, I decided to “get physical”. I am spending 3-4 hours everyday at the California Fitness gym, doing a wide range of “heavy” exercises such as kick-boxing, weight-training and spinning (indoor cycling). Twice a week, I do yoga exercises at home with the guidance of a trainer. Since this year, my physical condition has drastically improved. I sleep and eat well (I eat to live a healthy and good life). I enjoy driving around the Kuala Lumpur city with my wife everyday and going overseas for holiday. I managed to reduce the daily dose of Parkinson’s medications recently. Sometimes, I wonder whether I am just a “normal person” I know that it is technically difficult to prove that exercise has neuroprotective effect in Parkinson’s patients. Despite this, I believe that exercise has slowed down my disease progression. I hope that my video recording will bring hope and happiness to all Parkinson’s patients in this world, by reminding them that they can still live a physically active life. Mr. Hero Teo, Kuala Lumpur

Saturday, November 13, 2010

low blood pressure affected your lifestyle

The consensus definition is a drop of > 20 mm Hg systolic, 10 mm Hg diastolic, or both.

I have low blood pressure caused by side effect of parkinson's medication and insomina drugs.

The medication of requip and Jumax are the one that causes me with low blood pressure

The symptoms are dizziness on standing up and expereince a fall sitting on the floor, faintness, light-headedness, confusion or blurred vision occur within seconds to a few minutes of standing.

The low blood pressure affected my lifestyle and make me changes

Standing up slowly rather than quickly, as the delay can give the blood vessels more time to constrict properly. This can help avoid incidents of syncope (fainting).

Take a deep breath and flex your abdominal muscles while rising to maintain blood and oxygen in the brain.Maintaining a proper fluid intake to prevent the effects of dehydration.

As eating lowers blood pressure, take your food in a larger number of smaller meals. Take extra care when standing after eating.
When orthostatic hypotension is caused by hypovolemia due to medications, the disorder may be reversed by adjusting the dosage or by discontinuing the medication.
When the condition is caused by prolonged bed rest, improvement may occur by sitting up with increasing frequency each day. In some cases, physical counterpressure such as elastic hose (stockings) or whole-body inflatable suits may be required.
Many people who experience orthostatic hypotension are able to recognise the symptoms and quickly adopt a "squat position" to avoid falling during an episode. This is because they are usually unable to co-ordinate a return to sitting in a chair, once the episode has commenced.
Avoiding bodily positions that impede blood flow, such as sitting with knees up to chest or crossing legs.


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Tuesday, November 9, 2010

DBS

DBS is only suitable for late stage of pD as all the available source to slow down the disease unsuccessful and the canditate by choice of medical team to receive the DBS. The canditate who receives the treatment has to take life risks during the surgery and does not guarantee the PD recovery to normal. He has to continue to take medication and do battery service and maintance by doctor and have to replace every three years

Sunday, November 7, 2010

Is parkinson's not the end? End stage of parkinson''s disease

Is parkinson's not the end?
End Stage of Parkinson's Disease

At the beginning of the Parkinson's disease, the symptoms are mild but as it progresses towards the end stages the symptoms become more severe. In the first stages slight tremors, forgetfulness and fatigue is observed. As the disease progresses to its next stages, the symptoms like loss of balance, rigidity (Muscle stiffness) and walking problems are observed. These symptoms are often noticeable to family members or friends. In the next stages, the people find so much problem in balancing themselves that they gradually fall. A change in handwriting and speech is also observed.

In the fourth and fifth stages of Parkinson's disease, the symptoms become worse. By this time, the symptoms become so severe that the person is completely disabled and has to completely depend on some one else. Muscles become so stiff that the movements become slow and the person is unable to perform his daily tasks. As the disease comes to its end stage or final stage, it is developed fully.

The end stage takes over all the physical movements of a person. The person is not able to take care of himself. He is unable to walk or stand and is restricted to chair or bed. They lose their urinary and bowel control and can't even turn around by themselves. The speech becomes very slurred. They find problems in speaking and can take long time in expressing themselves as it might take time for the thoughts to reach words.

The person with end stage of Parkinson's disease can't swallow the food due to the choking. The mouth becomes dry. Sometimes the food can even enter into the lungs, which can cause breathing problems. In some cases with the end stages of the disease a feeding tube is inserted for feeding the things. Hallucinations are also observed in some people.

Here is the brief review of all what can happen in the end stages of Parkinson's disease. End stage of Parkinson's disease may include one or more of the following symptoms:

* Progressive decline in the symptoms despite medical treatments
* Progressive weight loss
* Frequent hospitalization
* Decreased appetite
* Repeated infections
* Trouble in breathing
* Trouble in swallowing
* Decline in mental status
* Weakness
* Drowsiness
* Fatigue

At the end stages of the disease person requires a constant nursing care. The end-stage of the Parkinson's disease can lead to pneumonia, choking, severe depression, and even death. Though there is no cure for the disease, use of medication is the most common way of slowing down the progression of the disease and keeping the patient healthy

Symptoms of Parkinson's

Symptoms of Parkinson's usually begin slowly, develop gradually and in no particular order.

Everyone with Parkinson's is very different and may have a different collection of symptoms and response to treatment.

The nature and severity of symptoms and the rate at which the condition progresses will also be individual. The symptoms may take years to progress.

However, since Parkinson's is a progressive condition, symptoms will worsen over
time and new ones may appear. It is difficult to estimate how quickly or slowly Parkinson's
will progress in each person. It may progress more quickly in people who are older when the
symptoms first begin.

Currently, there is no cure for Parkinson's. However, many of the motor symptoms can be
treated with medications. Medications used to treat the symptoms either replace the lost
dopamine or mimic the action of dopamine in the brain. Medications can alleviate the symptoms,
but do not slow the progression of Parkinson's. As the symptoms change, medications will need
to be adjusted.

Saturday, November 6, 2010

Dizziness

Dizziness, lightheadedness, and the feeling of passing out is a common complaint in patients who have low blood pressure.

When the blood pressure is too low, not enough oxygen-rich blood is being delivered to the brain, and its function can be affected. It lead you a fall. you have to learn how to monitor standing up, sitting on and lie down

Anemia (decreased red blood cell count)

Bleeding

Dehydration (loss of water in the body) often occurs with infections that cause vomiting and diarrhea. Fever also can cause a significant amount of water loss due to increased metabolic rate and excessive sweating as the body tries to cool itself.

Heat-related illnesses associated with dehydration such as heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke (a medical emergency).

.

My experience with mild seizures

I have been diagnosed as suffering from fluctuations in my blood pressure (BP). I have taken the Upright Tilt Test, and the results confirm that my BP fluctuates depending on the various positions I am in. As a result, my physician has prescribed Minirin to me to stablelize my BP.

Recently, owing to my stress due to personal issues and also the effect of Minirin, my BP shot up to 210/50. I vomitted and felt dizzy, and was subsequently hospitalized for observations. During my stay at the hospital, I also fell. It was discovered that the sodium level in my blood was very low. That apparently led to my dizziness and possibly blackout, which in turn led to my fall. I was given sodium solution through intravenous injection to increase my blood sodium level. I was subsequently discharged.

Subsequent to my discharge, my physician changed the dosage of my medication for both Parkinson's Disease (PD) and also the medication to maintain my BP. Minirin was substituted with Florinef. As far as PD is concerned, prior to my hospitalization, my daily dosage was Requip (6 mg), Sinemet 25/100 (6 tablets) and Jumax (50 mg). Both Requip and Jumax was stopped. I was asked by my physician to only take Sinemet 25/100 (6 tablets) daily to contain the progression of PD.

I subsequently experienced mild seizures, whereby I cannot move my hands and legs for perhaps a time span of 5 to 10 minutes. I would be frozen, so as to speak. This seizure episodes would take place nearly once everyday. It must be stressed that I didn't suffer from any seizure prior to the change in the dosage of my medication

check on the causes of your dizziness

Check on your Dizziness Causes


Dizziness may be caused or attributed by a wide variety of things. Some of the causes of dizziness require immediate medical attention. Examples of causes of dizziness include:

high blood pressure,
low blood pressure,
heart diseases or conditions (for example heart attack, arrhythmia,
strokes,
tumors,
headaches,
fainting,
dementia,
medication (for example, high blood pressure medications, sedatives, tranquilizers, antidepressants, pain relievers, certain antibiotics, and diuretics),
metabolic disorders (hypoxia, hypoglycemia, dehydration,
effects of aging,
internal bleeding,
anemia,
prolonged bed rest,
infections,
endocrine diseases (thyroid or pituitary gland),
depression,
anxiety,
panic disorders,
hyperventilation, and
somatization.

Friday, November 5, 2010

orthostatic hypotension

I have been diagnosed as suffering from fluctuations in my blood pressure (BP). I have taken the Upright Tilt Test, and the results confirm that my BP fluctuates depending on the various positions I am in. Due to my upright tilt table test conclusions

Asymptomatic through passsive tilting & given S/L GT
Postural hypotension 168/81 dropped to 91/51mmHg
Negative tilt table test

As a result, I put on compression stockings to stablelize my BP.People who have low blood pressure may also be told by their doctors that they should make use of the compression stockings typically used to deal with varicose veins. Low blood pressure can cause a pooling of blood in the veins which may or may not lead to varicose veins. Compression stockings can reduce that problem and can help keep people with low blood pressure medically safe.

My previous blood clot (T.I.A) in the year 2008 was caused by this fluctuation in my blood.

The side effects on my parkinson’s medications were also caused by this fluctuations in my blood i.e dizziness,lightheadedness,nausea,sweating,vomiting,shortness of breath and chest pain.

Using compression stockings to increase blood pressure in the legs Some people have low blood pressure all the time. They have no symptoms and their low readings are normal for them. In other people, blood pressure drops below normal because of some event or medical condition. Some people may experience symptoms of low pressure when standing up too quickly. Low blood pressure is a problem only if it causes dizziness, fainting or in extreme cases, shockMost normal blood pressures fall in the range of 90/60 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) to 130/80 mm Hg. But a significant drop, even as little as 20 mm Hg, can cause problems for some people

I have been suffering like you for years with Neurogenic Orthostatic Hypotension (NOH) and have found great relief from the clinical drug trial I have been involved with for the last 18 months. To get in the trial you had to have drops of 25 points standing to sitting, laying down etc. When approved the drug will be called Northera. Right now it is called Droxidopa. I found it has no side effects and works. It has been used in Japan for more than 20 years. Check it out on the Chelsea THerapeutics website.

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compression stocking

The first approach in treating orthostatic hypotension is to decrease the pooling of blood in the legs with the use of special stockings called compression stockings. These tight stockings “compress” the veins in the legs, helping to reduce swelling and increase blood flow. There now are a number of companies that make these stockings in a wide variety of sizes, and they usually can be found at stores that sell medical supplies, as well as at some pharmacies.

You should wear these stockings when you are up and about. You do not need to wear them when you are in bed. Further, it is recommend that you put the stockings on first thing in the morning while in bed and before getting up for your daily activities. It is important that you do not let the stockings bunch, gather, or roll, since this can compress the veins too much and could harm circulation. You should always watch for signs of decreased circulation, which could include discoloration of the skin, as well as pain or cramping, and numbness of the lower legs and feet.

If the stockings only provide some but not complete relief of symptoms, an abdominal binder can be used. The binder is another type of compression garment that is worn around the waist to help increase blood pressure. If these products fail to alleviate symptoms, certain drugs can be given to help increase blood volume. If you are taking these drugs, be sure to watch for signs of too much fluid in the body, such as swelling, bloating, or difficulty breathing. If these symptoms occur, call your doctor immediately

is to decrease the pooling of blood in the legs with the use of special stockings called compression stockings. These tight stockings “compress” the veins in the legs, helping to reduce swelling and increase blood flow. There now are a number of companies that make these stockings in a wide variety of sizes, and they usually can be found at stores that sell medical supplies, as well as at some pharmacies.

You should wear these stockings when you are up and about. You do not need to wear them when you are in bed. Further, it is recommend that you put the stockings on first thing in the morning while in bed and before getting up for your daily activities. It is important that you do not let the stockings bunch, gather, or roll, since this can compress the veins too much and could harm circulation. You should always watch for signs of decreased circulation, which could include discoloration of the skin, as well as pain or cramping, and numbness of the lower legs and feet.

If the stockings only provide some but not complete relief of symptoms, an abdominal binder can be used. The binder is another type of compression garment that is worn around the waist to help increase blood pressure. If these products fail to alleviate symptoms, certain drugs can be given to help increase blood volume. If you are taking these drugs, be sure to watch for signs of too much fluid in the body, such as swelling, bloating, or difficulty breathing. If these symptoms occur, call your doctor immediately

Is there a cure for parkinson's?

There is no cure for Parkinson’s at present. Drugs are used to try to control symptoms of Parkinson’s. There are no perfect drugs, although there are many promising developments.

Although there is no cure for Parkinson’s disease, there is effective treatment. No treatment has been definitively shown to stop or slow disease progression, but several studies are underway. The main two treatment approaches are medical and surgical.

Regular exercise promotes a feeling of physical and mental well-being, important in the management of PD. Although exercise does not slow progression of PD symptoms it can prevent or alleviate orthopedic effects of akinesia, rigidity and flexed posture such as shoulder, hip, and back pain and has also been shown to improve some motor functions. Supervised training including cardiovascular fitness exercise, muscle stretching and strengthening, and balance training have been found to be useful in some short- and long-term studies

The main aims of drug treatments for Parkinson’s are to:

•increase the level of dopamine that reaches the brain
•stimulate the parts of the brain where dopamine works
•block the action of other chemicals that affect dopamine.
In most newly diagnosed people considerable improvements can be achieved by careful introduction of anti-parkinsonian drugs.

As Parkinson’s is a very individual condition, medication is prescribed and adapted to individual needs. Response to medication varies from person to person and not every medication will be considered suitable for everyone. It is important to discuss appropriate medication or any changes in medication with your health care professional.

It is important to also maintain a healthy lifestyle, focusing on exercise, relaxation and diet.

Maximize your bodies potential with YOGA

http://www.patientslikeme.com/forum/show/83775?post_id=1237567#1237567

Govt pressured to set up Parkinson's clinic

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/10/03/3028190.htm

parkinson's,exeercise and physical speechy therapy

http:/knol.google.com/k/parkinson-s-disease#Exercise_and_physical(2F)speech_therapy

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

I started my PD medication again?

I have once stopped taking requip and sinemet when they give me vivid dream and complusive behaviour disorders
Sinemet and requip also caused me side effects with medications for acid reflex, Vit 6 and bladder by causing masked face, slurred speech,dizzines and stool with blood. I started continue my PD medication and stopped medication for other illness after my movement developing slow and tremors.

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bladder and urinary difficulties

http://www.zaobao.com/http://www.zaobao.com/

Monday, November 1, 2010

Gastric reflux and parkinson's

Gastric reflux is one of the non-motor symptoms of PD. It can cause irritation of the vocal folds and throat and can potentially cause voice hoarseness. It is possible that a person who has reflux doesn't have any symptoms of reflux that they recognize. For example, sometimes people feel as though they "have something stuck in my throat" after swallowing. These people may even seek a swallowing evaluation which turns out to be within normal limits. The reason is that when reflux irritates the vocal folds and throat area it can give the person the sensation that there is something stuck in their throat when, in fact, there is not. Another possible symptom of reflux is frequent throat clearing.

Parkinson disease itself can cause voice changes as well including soft voice, monotone voice, and hoarseness. Frequently people with PD have bowing of the vocal folds meaning that the vocal folds don't come together completely during talking. When the vocal folds do not close completely air can leak through resulting in a breathy or hoarse sounding voice. If you have reflux and vocal fold bowing the combination of these two factors can cause changes in your voice that could potentially interfere with functional communication.

If you think that you might be experiencing symptoms of reflux or changes in your voice you should consult with your physician. Successful management of reflux is usually a combination of medication and behavioral modifications. For example, it may be recommended to stop eating several hours before going to bed at night, eating more frequent smaller meals, raising the head of your bed, or making changes in your diet. A speech-language pathologist can advise you about behavioral modifications that may help you and can also advise you about receiving behavioral voice treatment to improve your communication abilities.

Leslie Mahler

Is there a cure for parkinson's?

There is no cure for Parkinson's at present. Drugs are used to try to control symptoms of Parkinson's. There are no perfect drugs, although there are many promising developments.

The main aims of drug treatments for Parkinson's are to:

increase the level of dopamine that reaches the brain
stimulate the parts of the brain where dopamine works
block the action of other chemicals that affect dopamine.
In most newly diagnosed people considerable improvements can be achieved by careful introduction of anti-parkinsonian drugs.

As Parkinson's is a very individual condition, medication is prescribed and adapted to individual needs. Response to medication varies from person to person and not every medication will be considered suitable for everyone. It is important to discuss appropriate medication or any changes in medication with your health care professional.

It is important to also maintain a healthy lifestyle, focusing on exercise, relaxation and diet.

possibility cure for parkinson's?

Researchers at Iowa State University have found an essential key to possibly cure Parkinson's disease and are looking for others.

Anumantha Kanthasamy, a distinguished professor of biomedical sciences and W. Eugene and Linda R. Lloyd Endowed Chair in Neurotoxicology at the ISU College of Veterinary Medicine, has been working to understand the complex mechanisms of the disease for more than a decade and thinks he has found hope for the cure.
's disease
Parkinson's disease sufferers lack a sufficient amount of a brain chemical called dopamine.

Kanthasamy's research shows that there is specific protein that is naturally present in human brains that -- for no known reason -- kills the brain cells that make dopamine.

The cells that are being killed are the ones that produce the needed dopamine.

"We have millions of cells in our brains," said Kanthasamy, "In Parkinson's, about 10,000 of these brain cells die; no one knows why."

Kanthasamy discovered that a novel protein -- known as protein kinase-C (specifically PKCĪ“) - is killing the dopamine-producing cells.

Kanthasamy and his research staff discovered a compound that neutralizes the cell-killing kinase-C and allows the dopamine-producing cells to survive and function.

"With a lot of hard work, and little bit of luck, we found something important," he said. "And when you find something like this you say, 'This is great because it can be a target for developing new drugs.'"

Now, Kanthasamy's group is looking for additional compounds that also can serve to neutralize protein kinase-C. By identifying more compounds that perform the function of neutralizing kinase-C, researchers are more likely to locate one that works well and has few side effects.

This discovery is expected to provide new treatment options to stop the progression of the disease or even cure it.

The study is being funded by a Grow Iowa Values Fund grant. The goal of the grant program is to support development of technologies with commercial potential and to support the growth of companies using those technologies. Kanthasamy is working on this research with PK Biosciences Corp., an Iowa-based startup company. Funding was also provided by the National Institutes of Health.

"Once we find the compound, we need to make sure it's safe. If everything goes well, it could take about 10 years, and then we might be able to see something that will truly make a difference in the lives of people with this disorder," said Kanthasamy.

Parkinson's disease strikes around 50,000 people each year, and there are approximately 1 million people with the disease. Parkinson's sufferers include actor Michael J. Fox and former boxing champion Muhammad Ali.

As people grow older, the cells that produce dopamine naturally die, causing dopamine levels to fall gradually over time. When the levels continue to drop below 60 to 70 percent, the person will start to have Parkinson's disease symptoms, according to Kanthasamy.

"Everybody has a little Parkinson's in theory," he said. "But you can't see it until the level of dopamine gets too low."

Eliminating the symptoms of Parkinson's disease doesn't require people to be restored to 100 percent of previous dopamine levels, but only to a fraction of that.

"If you can bring dopamine up to the 40-50 percent level, you'll see a functioning, normal person," he said.

Currently, there is no cure for Parkinson's and available therapies only treat the symptoms.

Major contributing factors for getting Parkinson's disease include prolonged exposure to metals or pesticides and other environmental chemicals, according to Kanthasamy.

Symptoms of Parkinson's disease include trembling in hands, arms, legs, jaw, and face; rigidity or stiffness of the limbs and trunk; slowness of movement; and impaired balance and coordination. As these symptoms become more pronounced, patients may have difficulty walking, talking, or completing other simple tasks. Because the disease typically affects people over the age of 50, the National Institutes of Health anticipates the incidence of Parkinson's will increase as the nation's population ages.

Source: Anumantha Kanthasamy
Iowa State University

8 people marked this post as helpful.

Saturday, October 30, 2010

fluctuation of blood pressure

The pressure with which the blood flows in the body is known as blood pressure. Normal adult blood pressure should be 120/80 mmHg. But it fluctuates many times in a day. The lowest blood pressure can be measured when we are sleeping or in a relaxed state, but if the blood pressure goes below 90/60 mmHg then this condition can be considered as low blood pressure. Low blood pressure is also known as hypotension. There are several side effects of low blood pressure. If not taken care of on time, it may take you to dangerous consequences.

Depending upon the causes and the condition of the individuals body the side effects of low blood pressure can be mild or dangerous. Some of the causes of low blood pressure are dehydration, severe bleeding due to injury, inflammation of any organ, heart diseases, heart blockage, low pulse rate, pregnancy, etc. It may also be caused due to the drug toxicity or due to the side effects of some medication. Age can also be a factor responsible for low blood pressure. It is very important to keep an eye on these causes so as to understand the risk factor of low blood pressure.

Low Blood Pressure: Side Effects

If the blood pressure is low, the organ will not be able to get enough oxygen. This may result in many complications and life threatening consequences. Hence it becomes very important to understand the side effects of low blood pressure. Following are some of them.

Nausea
This is one of the most common signs of low pressure. As the blood flow slows down in low blood pressure, there is a deficiency of blood and oxygen in the brain. This usually results in nausea. It can be caused due to the gastrointestinal distress.

Dizziness
Low blood pressure can result in dizziness and lightheadedness. Sudden change in the posture like immediately getting up from the bed after sleeping can also cause dizziness. This condition is also known as hypotension. It is mostly seen in people above the age of 60. It can also be a result of severe dehydration.

Fainting
Low blood pressure is considered as the most common cause for fainting. Insufficient amount of blood flow and scarcity of oxygen causes fainting. Due to this the people are at a greater risk of getting injured, as they can faint whenever their blood pressure drops drastically.

Effects on Heart
As the blood flow becomes slow and there is not enough pressure for the heart to pump blood to different parts of the body, it may result in many heart diseases. It may even result in heart attacks.

Effects on Brain
Due to the low blood pressure the brain is unable to get proper blood and oxygen. This may affect the nervous system and may result in confusion, metal illness, strokes, nerve damage etc. It may also affect the functioning of other parts of the body as every part of the body receives command from the brain.

Effects on Kidney
The work of a kidney is to eliminate the toxins from our body. But low blood pressure can hinder its work and may result in toxin build up in the kidney. This may even damage the kidney and increase the toxicity in the blood.

Now that you know about various side effects of low blood pressure you may need to go for a proper check up to find out the cause behind it. If the cause behind it is diagnosed, then treatment for low blood pressure will be easy but should be immediately. As it may take a life threatening turn, you should not ignore it at all.
By Niharika Arya
Published: 10/1/2010

Blood pressure

The pressure with which the blood flows in the body is known as blood pressure. Normal adult blood pressure should be 120/80 mmHg. But it fluctuates many times in a day. The lowest blood pressure can be measured when we are sleeping or in a relaxed state, but if the blood pressure goes below 90/60 mmHg then this condition can be considered as low blood pressure. Low blood pressure is also known as hypotension. There are several side effects of low blood pressure. If not taken care of on time, it may take you to dangerous consequences.

Depending upon the causes and the condition of the individuals body the side effects of low blood pressure can be mild or dangerous. Some of the causes of low blood pressure are dehydration, severe bleeding due to injury, inflammation of any organ, heart diseases, heart blockage, low pulse rate, pregnancy, etc. It may also be caused due to the drug toxicity or due to the side effects of some medication. Age can also be a factor responsible for low blood pressure. It is very important to keep an eye on these causes so as to understand the risk factor of low blood pressure.

Low Blood Pressure: Side Effects

If the blood pressure is low, the organ will not be able to get enough oxygen. This may result in many complications and life threatening consequences. Hence it becomes very important to understand the side effects of low blood pressure. Following are some of them.

Nausea
This is one of the most common signs of low pressure. As the blood flow slows down in low blood pressure, there is a deficiency of blood and oxygen in the brain. This usually results in nausea. It can be caused due to the gastrointestinal distress.

Dizziness
Low blood pressure can result in dizziness and lightheadedness. Sudden change in the posture like immediately getting up from the bed after sleeping can also cause dizziness. This condition is also known as hypotension. It is mostly seen in people above the age of 60. It can also be a result of severe dehydration.

Fainting
Low blood pressure is considered as the most common cause for fainting. Insufficient amount of blood flow and scarcity of oxygen causes fainting. Due to this the people are at a greater risk of getting injured, as they can faint whenever their blood pressure drops drastically.

Effects on Heart
As the blood flow becomes slow and there is not enough pressure for the heart to pump blood to different parts of the body, it may result in many heart diseases. It may even result in heart attacks.

Effects on Brain
Due to the low blood pressure the brain is unable to get proper blood and oxygen. This may affect the nervous system and may result in confusion, metal illness, strokes, nerve damage etc. It may also affect the functioning of other parts of the body as every part of the body receives command from the brain.

Effects on Kidney
The work of a kidney is to eliminate the toxins from our body. But low blood pressure can hinder its work and may result in toxin build up in the kidney. This may even damage the kidney and increase the toxicity in the blood.

Now that you know about various side effects of low blood pressure you may need to go for a proper check up to find out the cause behind it. If the cause behind it is diagnosed, then treatment for low blood pressure will be easy but should be immediately. As it may take a life threatening turn, you should not ignore it at all.
By Niharika Arya
Published: 10/1/2010

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

PLM reader

I really liked your positive attitude about the importance of exercise in fighting PD and in keeping mobility.

Before PD I was a fitness instructor-- now, I've had to take a break and reassess my own exercise plan but I could use some help and encouragement... Maybe we can find a way to keep each other motivated.

I created a forum on an exercise and fitness website called, "Living With a Chronic Illness-- Yet Keeping Fit!" recently and would really like to see you join and post specifics on your exercise plans and struggles to keep fit. TOGETHER we can fight this disease and exercise is the one thing to show we are still in control.

Please take a moment to look at the forum and feel free to join and start submitting to discussion!!

Here's the link to forum:

http://www.realsolutionsmag.com/idealbb/forum.asp?forumID=107



Posted Apr 24, 2008 03:22PM

Monday, October 25, 2010

Personal stories

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You are here: Community > Personal Stories
Personal Stories.Secret recipe behind the mask

Hero Teo
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTpu_zBvDME

I often smiled when I watched the video recording of my kick-boxing exercise which I uploaded to You Tube. My trainers and videographer told me the same thing – “You do not look like a Parkinson’s patient at all”. Even my doctor shook his head in disbelief and said, “This is shocking. I can’t imagine a 70-year-old Parkinson’s patient doing a very strenuous exercise such as kickboxing. I am sure that you are the only Parkinson’s patient in Malaysia who is doing the kickboxing exercise.”

As early as 1998, I already had both the motor and non-motor symptoms. Since my diagnosis in 2002, I went through a period of depression, anxiety, denial and anger. Subsequently, I bounced back after discovering a secret recipe for fighting Parkinson’s, which consisted of: knowledge (is power), exercise, medications, nutrition / supplements and prayer. In my quest for knowledge, I surfed various Parkinson’s websites, raining them with questions, questions and questions. I even started the first Parkinson’s blog in Malaysia (www.heroteo.com). I tried to learn everything about Parkinson’s in order to overcome all complications - the Chinese heroes won the battles by understanding their enemy first.

Animal experiments showed that exercise may be neuroprotective. Rats which were forced to exercise had a lesser degree of brain damage after they were exposed to poison. In mice which were made to undergo treadmill exercise, there was increased production of dopamine.

Parkinson’s patients are comparable to the car. The medications are needed to help patients to start walking, while fuel or battery is needed to help start the car engine. Exercise is needed to improve the patients’ physical mobility and endurance, while driving helps to recharge the battery. Thus, exercise helps our “engines” warm up before leaving home and keep the “cars” going everyday. Even healthy people such as Bruce Lee, the Chinese Kung Fu master, know that exercise is beneficial.

As such, since 2005, I decided to “get physical”. I spend 3-4 hours everyday at the California Fitness gym, doing a wide range of “heavy” exercise such as kick-boxing, weight-training and spinning (indoor cycling). Twice a week, I do yoga exercise at home with the guidance of a trainer.

Since this year, my physical condition has drastically improved. I sleep and eat well (I eat to live, and live to eat). I enjoy driving around the Kuala Lumpur city with my wife everyday and going overseas for holiday. I managed to reduce the daily dose of Parkinson’s medications recently. Sometimes, I wonder whether I am just a “normal person” behind the mask.

I know that it is technically difficult to prove that exercise has neuroprotective effect in Parkinson’s patients. Despite this, I believe that exercise has slowed down my disease progression. I hope that my video recording will bring hope and happiness to all Parkinson’s patients in this world, by reminding them that they can still live a physically active life.



See all Personal Stories

Q & A

HI! teokimhoe, at your age of 71 yrs. it is difficult for your body to cope up with the different medications for different ailments you suffer from. You need to take up a complete evaluation of your condition from different specialists like a cardiologist, neurologist, neurosurgeon, psychiatrist and a physician. Thus you need to find a hospital or a health centre which has all the above specialist, who after examining you will evaluate your present condition and then coordinate between themselves so that they offer you a treatment which takes in to perspective the pros and cons of all the drugs to be prescribed to you. PD is a progressive disease and as the age increases the neurons and the muscle groups affecting them will be increasing in number as well as size. Doctors treating you presently are doing a good job, so it will be advisable to tell them to refer you to a hospital in Los Angeles or San Francisco, that has all the specialties mentioned above. The advantage will be that the new centre can get back to your doctors as they will need the input in your case from time to time for smooth progression of your treatment. Take care.

Comment by Dr.Kokil Mathur on Mon 25, Oct 2010 08:17am: Hi Teo Kim Hoo! Yes seizure is a side effect of Zoloft and Zydis causes twitching resembling uncontrolled movements of eyes, lips, tongue, face, arms, or legs almost mimicking seizures. So this is one possibility you will need to discuss with your doctor. Dehydration, certain medications (like the ones you are taking), heart problems, untreated diabetes, and nervous system disorders can all cause postural hypotension or fluctuation of Bp with change in position. TIAs or transient ischemic attacks can also be the cause. Certain internal ear problems can also affect blood pressure monitoring by the body by not properly signaling a change in position. Blood pressure monitoring, tilt table test (this you had), EKG, heart echo, ambulatory blood pressure recording are all required to monitor the problem. Uncontrolled shaking, dizziness and a feeling like you will pass out is usually seen with Requip. This may be the reason it was stopped. Minirin causes low sodium so this was changed to Florinef. PD may not have progressed in your case but yes a proper dose adjustment is what is probably required to control symptoms. Despite proper medications PD patients often feel spasms and twitching. Talk to your treating doctor and ask for a referral for a specialist in the US. It is difficult to suggest someone on net and it is always advisable to go through proper reference so that your case can be properly discussed between the treating doctors. Please let me know if there is any thing else and do keep me posted. Take care!

Saturday, October 23, 2010

compression stockings and hypontremia

I have been diagnosed as suffering from fluctuations in my blood pressure (BP). I have taken the Upright Tilt Test, and the results confirm that my BP fluctuates depending on the various positions I am in.Due to my upright tilt table test conclusions

Asymptomatic through passsive tilting & given S/L GT
Postural hypotension 168/81 dropped to 91/51mmHg
Negative tilt table test



As a result, I put on compression stockings to stablelize my BP.
People who have low blood pressure may also be told by their doctors that they should make use of the compression stockings typically used to deal with varicose veins. Low blood pressure can cause a pooling of blood in the veins which may or may not lead to varicose veins. Compression stockings can reduce that problem and can help keep people with low blood pressure medically safe.


My previous blood clot (T.I.A) in the year 2008 was caused by this fluctuation in my blood.
The side effects on my parkinson's medicationn were also caused by this fluctuations in my blood i.e dizziness,lightheaded,nausea ,up and down, go and off. Some people have low blood pressure all the time. They have no symptoms and their low readings are normal for them. In other people, blood pressure drops below normal because of some event or medical condition. Some people may experience symptoms of low pressure when standing up too quickly. Low blood pressure is a problem only if it causes dizziness, fainting or in extreme cases, shockcauses dizziness, fainting extreme cases, shock.

Most normal blood pressures fall in the range of 90/60 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) to 130/80 mm Hg. But a significant drop, even as little as 20 mm Hg, can cause problems for some people.


How Is Orthostatic Hypotension Treated?
The first approach in treating orthostatic hypotension is to decrease the pooling of blood in the legs with the use of special stockings called compression stockings. These tight stockings “compress” the veins in the legs, helping to reduce swelling and increase blood flow. There now are a number of companies that make these stockings in a wide variety of sizes, and they usually can be found at stores that sell medical supplies, as well as at some pharmacies.

You should wear these stockings when you are up and about. You do not need to wear them when you are in bed. Further, it is recommend that you put the stockings on first thing in the morning while in bed and before getting up for your daily activities. It is important that you do not let the stockings bunch, gather, or roll, since this can compress the veins too much and could harm circulation. You should always watch for signs of decreased circulation, which could include discoloration of the skin, as well as pain or cramping, and numbness of the lower legs and feet.

If the stockings only provide some but not complete relief of symptoms, an abdominal binder can be used. The binder is another type of compression garment that is worn around the waist to help increase blood pressure. If these products fail to alleviate symptoms, certain drugs can be given to help increase blood volume. If you are taking these drugs, be sure to watch for signs of too much fluid in the body, such as swelling, bloating, or difficulty breathing. If these symptoms occur, call your doctor immediately




:Some suggestions for minimizing the effects include:

Standing up slowly rather than quickly, as the delay can give the blood vessels more time to constrict properly. This can help avoid incidents of syncope (fainting).
Take a deep breath and flex your abdominal muscles while rising to maintain blood and oxygen in the brain. This, however, may be contraindicated in individuals with Stage 2 hypertension. Usually medical personnel have their patients "dangle" before rising from bed to decrease the likelihood of dizziness/falling due to orthostatic hypotension. The dangling is done by having the patient sit on the side of their bed for about a minute so they do not have the sudden dizziness.
Maintaining an elevated salt intake, through sodium supplements or electrolyte-enriched drinks. A suggested value is 10 g per day; overuse can lead to hypertension and should be avoided.
Maintaining a proper fluid intake to prevent the effects of dehydration.
As eating lowers blood pressure, take your food in a larger number of smaller meals. Take extra care when standing after eating.
When orthostatic hypotension is caused by hypovolemia due to medications, the disorder may be reversed by adjusting the dosage or by discontinuing the medication.
When the condition is caused by prolonged bed rest, improvement may occur by sitting up with increasing frequency each day. In some cases, physical counterpressure such as elastic hose (stockings) or whole-body inflatable suits may be required.
Many people who experience orthostatic hypotension are able to recognise the symptoms and quickly adopt a "squat position" to avoid falling during an episode. This is because they are usually unable to co-ordinate a return to sitting in a chair, once the episode has commenced.
Avoiding bodily positions that impede blood flow, such as sitting with knees up to chest or crossing legs.
[edit] Prognosis





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Monday, October 18, 2010

My story with hypontremia

A wrongly prescription Minirin for hypontremia by doctor resulted my sodium at low level and have to stay for five day in the hospital I was released from hospital until my sodium level to normal level 135.

In the hospital I was inserted with sudium into my body days and night for five days and slept with sleeping pills.
.
The side effects of Minirin are vomitting, dizziness and short of breath and lowering down your normal sodium level

As the result I was instructed to stop taking requip and jumax except Sinemet regular.

Hyponatremia is the result of insufficient sodium in the body fluid that surrounds cells. Proper sodium levels are important in maintaining blood pressure and in keeping nerves and muscles functioning properly. The condition of having insufficient or low levels of sodium is called hyponatremia.
.

Common symptoms of hyponatremia include fatigue, irritability, headache, and water retention, loss of appetite, and nausea or vomiting. Other signs or symptoms of hyponatremia are mental in nature and include abnormal or confused mental status, hallucination, and possibly unconsciousness. Often times abnormal presence of mind and confusion are the first serious symptoms of hyponatremia as the brain cells cannot accommodate swelling due to the water retention that accompanies hyponatremia.

Hyponatremia is diagnosed through serum and urine testing. There is generally always an underlying cause of hyponatremia, which must also be diagnosed and treated. Insufficient sodium levels can be treated with intravenous fluids, restricted diet, and supplemental oxygen. Medications that offset some of the symptoms of hyponatremia can also be administered to restore comfort and prevent seizures.

Causes of hyponatremia include burns, dehydration due to excessive vomiting or diarrhea, congestive heart failure, as a side effect of diuretics, kidney disease and certain other diseases. Acute hyponatremia, such as a sudden reduction in sodium levels over a 24 to 48 hour period due to extreme physical exertion or dehydration, is considered more dangerous than chronic hyponatremia that can occur with certain diseases or disorders.

Praise Lord I started again my requip and Jumax without problems as they are essential to stable my foot on floor without freeze,

I am glad to start again going to gym to attend my exercises program.

Teo's experience is one we should all be aware of. He is describing one of a dozen electrolyte problems that can catch us by surprise. Not only sodium but also minerals like potassium, calcium, and magnesium - all are absolute requirements for nerves and muscles to function. The symptoms merge seamlessly with those of PD and the causes can range from medication problems to simple polyuria. In fact, if you have to pee much in the night you should not only think in terms of water loss but also mineral. Ditto if you exercise a lot. The effects can be dramatic but are easily written off as PD.

Thanks for sharing. I hope you have fully recovered and are up and running.


Kind regards/Lawrence

Hi Mr Teo,


Hope everything is well with you now. :)




Take care.
Chai HowEDear Doctor I have been diagnosed as suffering from fluctuations in my blood pressure (BP). I have taken the Upright Tilt Test, and the results confirm that my BP fluctuates depending on the various positions I am in. As a result, my physician has prescribed Minirin to me to stablelize my BP.Recently, owing to my stress due to personal issues and also the effect of Minirin, my BP shot up to 210/50. I vomitted and felt dizzy, and was subsequently hospitalized for observations. During my stay at the hospital, I also fell. It was discovered that the sodium level in my blood was very low. That apparently led to my dizziness and possibly blackout, which in turn led to my fall. I was given sodium solution through intravenous injection to increase my blood sodium level. I was subsequently discharged.Subsequent to my discharge, my physician changed the dosage of my medication for both Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and also the medication to maintain my BP. Minirin was substituted with Florinef. As far as PD is concerned, prior to my hospitalization, my daily dosage was Requip (6 mg), Sinemet 25/100 (6 tablets) and Jumax (50 mg). Both Requip and Jumax was stopped. I was asked by my physician to only take Sinemet 25/100 (6 tablets) daily to contain the progression of PD.I subsequently experienced mild seizures, whereby I cannot move my hands and legs for perhaps a time span of 5 to 10 minutes. I would be frozen, so as to speak. This seizure episodes would take place nearly once everyday. It must be stressed that I didn’t suffer from any seizure prior to the change in the dosage of my medication. My worries are as follows :- (a) Is it normal for patients suffering from PD to have episodes of seizures? Are these seizures a sign that my PD has advanced in progression? (b) Is it correct for my physician to reduce the dosages of my PD medication so significantly? And does such a reduction result in my seizure, or perhaps an advance in the progression of PD? (c) What are the causes of such seizures? For your information, I am also under treatment for Bipolar Syndrome, and I am on medication of Zoloft and Zydis. Does this medication also contribute to seizures, as a side effect? I shall be very grateful if you could revert to me on the above. I am also considering coming over to the US for continued treatment of PD and possibly Bipolar Syndrome. I shall be very grateful if you could refer some of the good physicians for consultation, preferably in Los Angeles or San Francisco. Best regards Teo Kim Hoo

PLM Post Yoga

incredible! Teo, I just watched your Yoga Youtube video. How incredible! Thank you so much for the motivation. The half moon, tabletop and scale postures are really challenging. You give me hope. I added that clip to my favorites
Doing facial therapy helpful to relief facial masked.

Is it helpful for slurred speech?

Is relief the facial muscle helpful people with slurred speech?

Kindly advise


TEOKIMHOE

to help the PD patients aware the diseases and encourage to set up support groups to educate the patients and their immediate families

Dr. Mahler

Advanced Member

Group:
Speech Clinician Moderators Posts:
13 Joined:
02-April 07 Posted Yesterday, 02:28 PM

There is no evidence that facial therapy helps slurred speech. That is because the movements for facial therapy are very different from those required for speech movement. If a person with PD wants to improve their understandability, then they need to engage in intensive voice and speech exercise. As one example, there is a lot of literature supporting LSVT LOUD, an intensive voice treatment that incroporates some of the principles of neural plasticity.

Communication is very important for quality of life. I recommend anyone who is wanting to learn more about therapy to help slurred speech get a prescription from their doctor for an evaluation by a speech-language pathologist familiar wtih treatment of people with PD. The neuroscience literature supports early intervention before it is hard to understand the person.

Friday, October 8, 2010

My experience with Minirin 2

I had negative upright table test in Raffles Hospital Singapore


My doctor prescribes me Minirin to increase my low blood pressure

I vomitted by taking Mirnirn on the five day. I had dizzinness, tiredness and low blood pressure too.

My doctor instructed me to do MRI brain screening and heart XR again with anticipation of a second stroke as I had once T.I.A in 2008.
I have to stop taking Requip and Jumax dosages.

I have been with these medication more than 5 years.

As the result I have duminess leg and could not stable on standing up.
My sodium had gone down to 120 level.
.
I had to stay in the hospital to receive my first times compond sudium lactate Intravenous B.P Three bottles daily to increase my sodium level to normal.

Minirin
Minirin works by increasing the amount of water that is reabsorbed by your kidneys.
When it is given in higher doses, it can also raise your blood pressure.

Because the medication is causing your kidneys to reabsorb water, this can lead to your sodium levels to drop.
If your sodium levels drop too much, this can make you very ill. At sodium levels of 120, you can feel nauseated, more short of breath, dizzy, fatigued and be vomiting.

So, much of your symptoms were likely due to your low sodium, which was

There are many potential reasons for orthostasis or dizziness on standing up. Dopamine agonists and TCA antidepressants can have this as a side effect. Alternatively it could be an issue of hydration and you may need 6-8 glasses of water a day and compression stockings. Occassionally drugs like midodrine, florinef and mestinon are needed to keep the BP up._________________Michael S. Okun, M.D.
Back to top

Bipolar,disorder

Dear Dr.Okun,

I have bipolar disorder resulted I have up and down blood level.

My doctor advises me to consult Psychiatrist.

I have to stop taking my PD medication Jumax and Requip;

My upright Tilt table test is 168/81 mkmHg dropped to 91/51 mmHg.

Regards

TEOKIMHOE

to help the PD patients aware the diseases and encourage to set up support groups to educate the patients and their immediate families
0

My experience with Minirin

I have been diagnosed as suffering from fluctuations in my blood pressure (BP). I have taken the Upright Tilt Test, and the results confirm that my BP fluctuates depending on the various positions I am in. As a result, my physician has prescribed Minirin to me to stablelize my BP.

Recently, owing to my stress due to personal issues and also the effect of Minirin, my BP shot up to 210/50. I vomitted and felt dizzy, and was subsequently hospitalized for observations. During my stay at the hospital, I also fell. It was discovered that the sodium level in my blood was very low. That apparently led to my dizziness and possibly blackout, which in turn led to my fall. I was given sodium solution through intravenous injection to increase my blood sodium level. I was subsequently discharged.

Subsequent to my discharge, my physician changed the dosage of my medication for both Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and also the medication to maintain my BP. Minirin was substituted with Florinef. As far as PD is concerned, prior to my hospitalization, my daily dosage was Requip (6 mg), Sinemet 25/100 (6 tablets) and Jumax (50 mg). Both Requip and Jumax was stopped. I was asked by my physician to only take Sinemet 25/100 (6 tablets) daily to contain the progression of PD.

I subsequently experienced mild seizures, whereby I cannot move my hands and legs for perhaps a time span of 5 to 10 minutes. I would be frozen, so as to speak. This seizure episodes would take place nearly once everyday. It must be stressed that I didn’t suffer from any seizure prior to the change in the dosage of my medication.

My worries are as follows :-

(a) Is it normal for patients suffering from PD to have episodes of seizures? Are these seizures a sign that my PD has advanced in progression?
( Is it correct for my physician to reduce the dosages of my PD medication so significantly? And does such a reduction result in my seizure, or perhaps an advance in the progression of PD?
© What are the causes of such seizures?

For your information, I am also under treatment for Bipolar Syndrome, and I am on medication of Zoloft and Zydis. Does this medication also contribute to seizures, as a side effect?

I shall be very grateful if you could revert to me on the above.

I am also considering coming over to the US for continued treatment of PD and possibly Bipolar Syndrome. I shall be very grateful if you could refer some of the good physicians for consultation, preferably in Los Angeles or San Francisco.

Best regards

Teo Kim Hoo

to help the PD patients aware the diseases and encourage to set up support groups to educate the patients and their immediate families

I have answered most of these already in your previous posts, so I would ask that you look back through those posts.

There is a NPF center of excellence at UCSF in San Fran and one at USC in LA.

Good luck.

wrongly prescription Minirin

Wrongly prescription minirin
Posted on October 8th, 2010 by heroteo
I have been diagnosed as suffering from fluctuations in my blood pressure (BP). I have done the Upright Tilt Table Test and the results confirmed fluctuations in my BP on various positions. My physician prescribed me Minirin to stablelize my BP. Due to my stress from personal issues and also the effect of Minirin, I discovered one day that my BP had increased to 210/50. I started vomitting and I was thereafter hospitalized for observation. It was there they discovered that the sodium level in my blood is low, and that further led to me falling. I was eventually discharged.

Upon discharged, my physician decreased my intake of Parkinson’s daily medication from Requip (6 mg), Sinemet 25/100 (6 tablets) and Jumex (10mg) to only Sinemet 25/100 (6 Tablets). Requip and Jumex has been stopped. He had also substituted Minirin to Florinef to stablelize my BP level.

Lately I have experienced mild seizures in the sense that I temporarily cannot move my legs and limbs for approximately 5 - 10 minutes duration. This has happened nearly once everyday. This could very well be due to an immediate decrease in my BP when I stand up.

However, my worries are as follows :-

(a) Whether seizures are common amongst patients suffering from PD. If yes, is it a sign of advancement of PD progression?
( What is the exact cause for such seizures to occur?
© Has my PD medication been decreased too significantly? For your information, I have never experienced seizures before the change in medication dosages.

For your further information, I am also on medication for Bipolar Syndrome, namely, Zydis 5 mg daily, Zoloft 50 mg. Does these medication also result in side effects?

I would be grateful for your input.

Best regards
Teo Kim Hoo

Teo, I will post for you. Seizures is not common in PD and seizures have a different etiology than PD

PLM reader

I subscribe to your page because you seem to have the energy and the will to fight PD and I would like to be like you. I am trying to fight as you do!

Posted Oct 20, 2009 10:29PM

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

Minirin

Minirin works by increasing the amount of water that is reabsorbed by your kidneys.
When it is given in higher doses, it can also raise your blood pressure.

Because the medication is causing your kidneys to reabsorb water, this can lead to your sodium levels to drop.
If your sodium levels drop too much, this can make you very ill. At sodium levels of 120, you can feel nauseated, more short of breath, dizzy, fatigued and be vomiting.

So, much of your symptoms were likely due to your low sodium, which was due to the minirin.
Medical
Ask a Medical Question, Get an Answer AS

why Minirin caused side effects vomiting,short of heart breath,tired and sodium at abnormal level at 120

Your Expert needs more information
From Dr. Abby
Tuesday, October 05, 2010 6:52 PM EST

Hello,

First, why were you on the medication?

to increase my low blood level as there are at negative level upright and sit down. short of breath, tir

Expert

You have received an Answer!
From Dr. Abby
Tuesday, October 05, 2010 7:13 PM EST

Ok, thank you for clarifying,

Minirin works by increasing the amount of water that is reabsorbed by your kidneys.
When it is given in higher doses, it can also raise your blood pressure.

Because the medication is causing your kidneys to reabsorb water, this can lead to your sodium levels to drop.
If your sodium levels drop too much, this can make you very ill. At sodium levels of 120, you can feel nauseated, more short of breath, dizzy, fatigued and be vomiting.

So, much of your symptoms were likely due to your low sodium, which was due to the minirin.

Feel free to ask any follow up questions,

Dr Abby

Monday, October 4, 2010

defination of cure of PD

The word “cure” is often used as the stated, or assumed, ultimate goal of Parkinson’s disease research. The more I think about it, the less sure I am just what constitutes a “cure” in connection to PD. A big part of the difficulty of coming up with a definition may be because it’s tough to separate effects of the disease itself, medications and the simple process of aging.

So …. can you offer a working definition of what a “cure” is in relation to PD?

Great question.

A cure is usually when the disease has been completely eradicated from an individual patient.

Symptomatic therapy is when a therapy helps improve individual symptoms.

Disease modification is when a therapy improves the course or slows the course of the disease.

Hope that helps.

Michael S. Okun, M.D.

new drug for hypotension

Advanced Member

Group:
Ask the Doctor Moderators Posts:
732 Joined:
19-January 07 LocationUniversity of Florida Posted Today, 01:08 PM

Dear forum members,

Forty percent or more of PD patients suffer from orthostatic hypotension (dizziness when standing, passing out, etc.). Dr. Lowe from the Mayo clinic presented some very promising results at the World Congress for PD in Scotland last week.

There is a drug called droxidopa in trials; which is a hydroxylated form of levodopa.

Though this may be above some heads I want to mention the two mechanisms of action:

1- post-ganglionic alpha 1 receptor is stimulated on aterioles
2- there seems to be repletion of adrenergic terminals with the neurochemical norepinephrine in both the peripheral nervous system and the central nervous system

The preliminary data is yet to be released but what was presented was very promising.

Midodrine which is another drug available to treat this condition has a greater effect on the blood pressure when lying down. Droxidopa has a greater effect when standing which is potentially more clinically important to patients.

The droxidopa seems to be well tolerated.

We await to hear about the 20-25% of patients who were excluded from the studies because the drug didn't seem to be effective enough in the dose titration part of the study,

We will keep you posted as more data becomes available.

Michael S. Okun, M.D.

parkinson and blood pressure

Posted: Fri Apr 18, 2008 6:13 am Post subject: Parkinson’s medication and Blood pressure

Dear Doctor, I am taking Lavodopa,Carbidopa and dopamin agonist for two year Close monitoring is required for people with certain medical condition. After I have a minor stroke (T.I.A) recently, I experience two different blood pressure i.e. decreased blood pressure when rising from a seated position or lie-down on bed after lengths of times. I feel dizziness on standing,headache or fainting My mouth run dry and thirsty Insomnia, anxiey, and fatigue, malaise Kindly elaborate Thanks TEOKIMHOE
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Dr. OkunJoined: 19 Jan 2007Posts: 251Location: University of Florida
Posted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 7:05 pm Post subject:

There are many potential reasons for orthostasis or dizziness on standing up. Dopamine agonists and TCA antidepressants can have this as a side effect. Alternatively it could be an issue of hydration and you may need 6-8 glasses of water a day and compression stockings. Occassionally drugs like midodrine, florinef and mestinon are needed to keep the BP up._________________Michael S. Okun, M.D.
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Anonymous
Posted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 9:47 pm Post subject:

Normal blood pressure is regulated by specific reflexes in the nervous system. Parkinson’s disease can impair this reflex mechanism and result in lowered blood pressure.Low blood pressure usually presents itself as side-effect of anti parkinson’s medications. Levodopa-carbidopa, dopamine agonists and other antidepressions and sleeping medications may potentiate a hypotensive event Source: Linda P.Miller,R.N.Med Posted by Hero Teo at 10
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Anonymous
Posted: Sat Apr 26, 2008 2:16 am Post subject: dizzinness and parkinson’s medication

I am glad that your dizziness has subsided. Dizziness is a very common symptom among Parkinson’s patients. It needs extensive work-up, e.g. blood pressure, heart rhythm, blood tests (diabetes) and even brain scan. A common cause of dizziness among Parkinson’s patients is the medications for PD, which can lower the blood pressure. Commonly, I use fludrocortisone to elevate the blood pressure. Parkinson’s patients need regular blood pressure monitoring (lying position and standing). Dr Chew Nee Kong, Kuala Lumpur.
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Dr. OkunJoined: 19 Jan 2007Posts: 251Location: University of Florida
Posted: Sun Apr 27, 2008 8:48 am Post subject:

Thanks for the nice comment._________________Michael S. Okun, M.D.

As dopamine agonists Ropinirole (Requip) can have this as a side effect (dizzinness at all time) I stop taking them i.e 6 mg Requip daily. I substitute Lavodopa 25/100 Sinemet 2 1/2 dosages with 2 dosage Jumax 5mg daily immediately.

florinef

Dear Doctor, I am taking Lavodopa,Carbidopa and dopamin agonist for two year Close monitoring is required for people with certain medical condition. After I have a minor stroke (T.I.A) recently, I experience two different blood pressure i.e. decreased blood pressure when rising from a seated position or lie-down on bed after lengths of times. I feel dizziness on standing,headache or fainting My mouth run dry and thirsty Insomnia, anxiey, and fatigue, malaise Kindly elaborate Thanks TEOKIMHOE
Back to top


Dr. OkunJoined: 19 Jan 2007Posts: 251Location: University of Florida
Posted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 7:05 pm Post subject:

There are many potential reasons for orthostasis or dizziness on standing up. Dopamine agonists and TCA antidepressants can have this as a side effect. Alternatively it could be an issue of hydration and you may need 6-8 glasses of water a day and compression stockings. Occassionally drugs like midodrine, florinef and mestinon are needed to keep the BP up._________________Michael S. Okun, M.D.
Back to top


Anonymous
Posted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 9:47 pm Post subject:

Normal blood pressure is regulated by specific reflexes in the nervous system. Parkinson's disease can impair this reflex mechanism and result in lowered blood pressure.Low blood pressure usually presents itself as side-effect of anti parkinson's medications. Levodopa-carbidopa, dopamine agonists and other antidepressions and sleeping medications may potentiate a hypotensive event Source: Linda P.Miller,R.N.Med Posted by Hero Teo at 10
Back to top


Anonymous
Posted: Sat Apr 26, 2008 2:16 am Post subject: dizzinness and parkinson's medication

I am glad that your dizziness has subsided. Dizziness is a very common symptom among Parkinson's patients. It needs extensive work-up, e.g. blood pressure, heart rhythm, blood tests (diabetes) and even brain scan. A common cause of dizziness among Parkinson's patients is the medications for PD, which can lower the blood pressure. Commonly, I use fludrocortisone to elevate the blood pressure. Parkinson's patients need regular blood pressure monitoring (lying position and standing). Dr Chew Nee Kong, Kuala Lumpur.
Back to top


Dr. OkunJoined: 19 Jan 2007Posts: 251Location: University of Florida
Posted: Sun Apr 27, 2008 8:48 am Post subject:

Thanks for the nice comment._________________Michael S. Okun, M.D. 4/28/08 by teo Delete

Born Parkinson's

I have heard of Parkinson’s Disease. I don’t understand how you get it. I was told you are born with it. Is this true and how do you know if you have it or not?
(anonymous)

Hide Answer

A:

At this time, we really don’t know if one is “born” with Parkinson’s disease
or becomes affected with it as he grows older. One theory suggests that some people are born with fewer dopamine-producing cells (either genetically
or that there is some problem during pregnancy - such as trauma or a virus -
which contributes to being born with fewer dopamine-producing cells). Then,
as the individual ages and naturally loses cells, this person would pass
the 80% dopaminergic neuronal loss that is needed before PD symptoms appear. Other theories suggest some sort of environmental insult causing the drop in
dopamine cells. Unfortunately, we just don’t know yet as these are theories
that must either be proven or disproven via research.

How do you know you have Parkinson’s disease? The best way is to consult a
neurologist who specializes in movement disorders. Neurology, while a
specialty itself, is split into sub-specialties. Parkinson’s disease is a
movement disorder so one who has additional training in movement
disorders, and thus sees primarily patients with such movement disorders, is the best type of physician to consult for a diagnosis.

Tags: Discussion by heroteo
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Wednesday, September 29, 2010

comment

comment
Just want to say what a great blog you got here!
I've been around for quite a lot of time, but finally decided to show my appreciation of your work!

Thumbs up, and keep it going!

Cheers
Christian, iwspo.net

Shy-Dragers

Dear Mr Teo,

I'm sure you will have a very good discussion with Dr Chew on the "Shy-Dragers" syndrome.

You are a fantastic PD patient - very resourceful to dig all the relevant medical information. Your knowledge can be as good as the medical specialist. Well done!

Take care & warm regards,
Hooi Hoon

reader PLikesME

Hi Teokimhoe

I would like to congratulate you on your approach to Parkinsons. I know of no-one who has had it as long as you. Your comments are very helpful and your disciplines something to be proud of.

One thing does amaze me. You take very little in the way of Parkinson’s medication (ie Sinemet and Requip). In fact people who are only at the beginning take more than you.

I am 72 years of age and have had PD for 15 years. I wonder if you could let me know how you handle the above meds. I do see from your profile you take medication for other problems of the body, probably related to your disease.

God Bless and keep on helping - it is so necessary as professionals seem to have no compassion.

Lippard (Freda Fewtrell from New Zeland

reader PLikesME

Hi Teokimhoe

I would like to congratulate you on your approach to Parkinsons. I know of no-one who has had it as long as you. Your comments are very helpful and your disciplines something to be proud of.

One thing does amaze me. You take very little in the way of Parkinson's medication (ie Sinemet and Requip). In fact people who are only at the beginning take more than you.

I am 72 years of age and have had PD for 15 years. I wonder if you could let me know how you handle the above meds. I do see from your profile you take medication for other problems of the body, probably related to your disease.

God Bless and keep on helping - it is so necessary as professionals seem to have no compassion.

Lippard (Freda Fewtrell from New Zealand)

Cancel

differences bt bipolar and PD

Dear Dr.Okun,

I am gone to research into bipolar and Parkinson's disorders

My experience why ARE the bipolar's medication after side effects SOME OF
THE SYMPTOMS ARE pARKINSON'S DISORDERS'?

Why Bipolar disorders is curable but not the Parkinson's disorders?

THEY ARE THE SAME FAMILY WHY THEY ARE DIFFERENCES?

kindly elaborate

Regards

Bipolar and PD are two completely different diseases.

Interestingly some patients with bipolar can become Parkinsonian from chronic use of dopamine blocking drugs. Sometimes when in the manic phase the PD symptoms improve.

Where they get confused is that they share a lot of the same brain circuitry.

Michael S. Okun, M.D.

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

bipolar disorder and parkinson's

IT IS STRANGE THE AFTER SIDEEFFECTS OF PD IS THE SYMPTOMS OF BIPOLAR DISORDEER MEDICATION

it's very interesting that you say that. When I was experiencing all of the crazy side effects from Requip I saw a neuro-psychiatrist. He told me I was bipolar and wanted to give me more medication and I quote him as saying, "It may make your Parkinson's much worse...". I was so lucky to meet my current neurologist who told me flat out that I needed to get off the drug. My life is normal again. Well, normal? Hmm, maybe that's the wrong word but I certainly have no side effects and that to me is just amazing.

Mark this post as helpful

flunction on blood pressure level (1)

Dear Doctor

I have been diagnosed as suffering from fluctuations in my blood pressure (BP). I have done the Upright Tilt Table Test and the results confirmed fluctuations in my BP on various positions. My physician prescribed me Minirin to stablelize my BP. Due to my stress from personal issues and also the effect of Minirin, I discovered one day that my BP had increased to 210/50. I started vomitting and I was thereafter hospitalized for observation. It was there they discovered that the sodium level in my blood is low, and that further led to me falling. I was eventually discharged.

Upon discharged, my physician decreased my intake of Parkinson's daily medication from Requip (6 mg), Sinemet 25/100 (6 tablets) and Jumex (10mg) to only Sinemet 25/100 (6 Tablets). Requip and Jumex has been stopped. He had also substituted Minirin to Florinef to stablelize my BP level.

Lately I have experienced mild seizures in the sense that I temporarily cannot move my legs and limbs for approximately 5 - 10 minutes duration. This has happened nearly once everyday. This could very well be due to an immediate decrease in my BP when I stand up.

However, my worries are as follows :-

(a) Whether seizures are common amongst patients suffering from PD. If yes, is it a sign of advancement of PD progression?
( What is the exact cause for such seizures to occur?
© Has my PD medication been decreased too significantly? For your information, I have never experienced seizures before the change in medication dosages.

For your further information, I am also on medication for Bipolar Syndrome, namely, Zydis 5 mg daily, Zoloft 50 mg. Does these medication also result in side effects?

I would be grateful for your input.

Best regards
Teo Kim Hoo

to help the PD patients aware the diseases and encourage to set up support groups to educate the patients and their immediate families
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#2 Dr. Okun

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19-January 07 LocationUniversity of Florida Posted Yesterday, 03:03 PM

Teo, I will post for you. Seizures is not common in PD and seizures have a different etiology than PD.

Michael S. Okun, M.D.

flunction on blood pressure level

Dear Doctor Okun,

I have been diagnosed as suffering from fluctuations in my blood pressure (BP). I have taken the Upright Tilt Test, and the results confirm that my BP fluctuates depending on the various positions I am in. As a result, my physician has prescribed Minirin to me to stablelize my BP.

Recently, owing to my stress due to personal issues and also the effect of Minirin, my BP shot up to 210/50. I vomitted and felt dizzy, and was subsequently hospitalized for observations. During my stay at the hospital, I also fell. It was discovered that the sodium level in my blood was very low. That apparently led to my dizziness and possibly blackout, which in turn led to my fall. I was given sodium solution through intravenous injection to increase my blood sodium level. I was subsequently discharged.

Subsequent to my discharge, my physician changed the dosage of my medication for both Parkinson's Disease (PD) and also the medication to maintain my BP. Minirin was substituted with Florinef. As far as PD is concerned, prior to my hospitalization, my daily dosage was Requip (6 mg), Sinemet 25/100 (6 tablets) and Jumax (50 mg). Both Requip and Jumax was stopped. I was asked by my physician to only take Sinemet 25/100 (6 tablets) daily to contain the progression of PD.

I subsequently experienced mild seizures, whereby I cannot move my hands and legs for perhaps a time span of 5 to 10 minutes. I would be frozen, so as to speak. This seizure episodes would take place nearly once everyday. It must be stressed that I didn't suffer from any seizure prior to the change in the dosage of my medication.

My worries are as follows :-

(a) Is it normal for patients suffering from PD to have episodes of seizures? Are these seizures a sign that my PD has advanced in progression?
( Is it correct for my physician to reduce the dosages of my PD medication so significantly? And does such a reduction result in my seizure, or perhaps an advance in the progression of PD?
© What are the causes of such seizures?

For your information, I am also under treatment for Bipolar Syndrome, and I am on medication of Zoloft and Zydis. Does this medication also contribute to seizures, as a side effect?

I shall be very grateful if you could revert to me on the above.

I am also considering coming over to the US for continued treatment of PD and possibly Bipolar Syndrome. I shall be very grateful if you could refer some of the good physicians for consultation, preferably in Los Angeles or San Francisco.


Best regards

Teo Kim Hoo

to help the PD patients aware the diseases and encourage to set up support groups to educate the patients and their immediate families
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#2 Dr. Okun

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19-January 07 LocationUniversity of Florida Posted Today, 05:44 PM

I have answered most of these already in your previous posts, so I would ask that you look back through those posts.

There is a NPF center of excellence at UCSF in San Fran and one at USC in LA.

Good luck.

Michael S. Okun, M.D.

Friday, September 24, 2010

uplight tilt table test

Due to my upright tilt table test conclusions

Asymptomatic through passsive tilting & given S/L GT
Postural hypotension 168/81 dropped to 91/51mmHg
Negative tilt table test

My doctor advises me to stop taking my medication Requip, Jumex due to sideeffect on me.

I have been with these medication more than 5 years.

As the result I have duminess leg and could not stable on standing up.

Besides I have low blood pressure. I have negative upright tilt table test report: postural hypotension 168/81 mmHg dropped to 91/51 mmHg

My doctor prescribed me Slow -K 600mg tablets two dosage daily.

I received first times compond sudium lactate Intravenous B.P Three bottles daily to increase my blood pressure five days stays in the hospital

i am advised to consult Psychiatrist as I have bipolar disorder due to depression and anxiety up and down and off and on days.

The bipolar disorder affecting my up and down blood pressure, not the PD medications.

Regards

TEOKIMHOE

Bipolar

I was admitted because my doctor wrongly prescribed Minirin as I had a difference on my upright tilt table postural hypotension from 169/81 mmHg dropped to 91/81 mm Hg

As I had T.I.A two years back I have to do Brain MRI and x ray as my sodium dropped by 120/138 in antipation there might be a second stroke. Besides I had vomitted and dizzinness.


I have to stay at hospoital five days to push up my sodium to normal level.

My doctor advises me to consult psychiatrist that I had Bipolar disorders.

My negative blood pressure are caused by bipolar disorder where I have anxiety and depression up and down on and off days resulted mu blood level.

Therefore there are reason for stopping taking the requip and Jumax'

to help the PD patients aware the diseases and encourage to set up support groups to educate the patients and their immediate families