Sunday, May 6, 2012

denture and saliva


Posted Sep 03 2009 11:26am

Anonymous
Posted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 8:39 am Post subject: denture and saliva

There are complaint by parkinson's patient how to deal with saliva and dentures. The saliva causes the dentures slippery and loose even there are denture paste if a gap develops between the denture and the gummy ridge Therefore the denture may need repeated relines. Shrinkage of the bone and gums can be minimized or prevented with a proven technique
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Dr. OkunJoined: 19 Jan 2007Posts: 251Location: University of Florida
Posted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 11:13 am Post subject:

This can be a troublesome issue. If you dry the saliva too much with an anticholinergic drug or botox you can also get cavities. I would suggest you work with the doctor to find the right solution for you, but to brush your remaining teeth frequently if you dry the saliva._________________Michael S. Okun, M.D.
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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

have trouble to standup after seated on chair or on bed for quite time.

kindly elaborate


TEOKIMHOE

to help the PD patients aware the diseases and encourage to set up support groups to educate the patients and their immediate families



This is common in PD and I would recommend physical and occupational therapy as well as medication optimization. Some people benefit from placing their feet farther back before trying to arise, and also using chairs with arms!
Michael S. Okun, M.D.
National Medical Director | NPF
UF Center for Movement Disorders & Neurorestoration
Read More about Dr. Okun at: mdc.mbi.ufl.edu

Thursday, April 5, 2012

heat and cold neuro

  • LocationMalaysia
  • Posted 03 April 2012 - 03:21 AM
    View PostDr. Okun, on 02 April 2012 - 06:25 AM, said:
    Not all patients have cold hands and feet with PD. I think the most important thing is to remember that PD affects the autonomic nervous system and this may explain cold and heat symptoms.

    Is it related that I have once recevied heat/sauna therapy massage affecting my nervous system and fainted?

    Kindly elaborate


    teokimhoe
    to help the PD patients aware the diseases and encourage to set up support groups to educate the patients and their immediate families
    0
    • +
    • -



    #7User is online teokimhoe

    • Advanced Member
    • PipPipPip
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    • Posts:306
    • Joined:03-March 07
    • LocationMalaysia
    Posted Yesterday, 09:37 AM
    I refer to your heat and cold affecting our neruo function.
    I have experience a heat therapy affecting my muscle movement

    Kindly elaborate

    teokimhoe
    to help the PD patients aware the diseases and encourage to set up support groups to educate the patients and their immediate families

    Tuesday, April 3, 2012

    I don't understand why parkison sufferers have cold hand and feet?

    Parkinson is a movement and non movement disorders.

    KIndly elaborate

    TEOKIMHOE
    to help the PD patients aware the diseases and encourage to set up support groups to educate the pa

    Not all patients have cold hands and feet with PD. I think the most important thing is to remember that PD affects the autonomic nervous system and this may explain cold and heat symptoms.
    Michael S. Okun, M.D.
    National Medical Director | NPF
    UF Center for Movement Disorders & Neurorestoration
    Read More about Dr. Okun at: mdc.mbi.ufl.edu
    0
    • +
    • -

    tients and their immediate families

    Wednesday, March 21, 2012

    I've Got a Life to Live

    Diagnosed at 34

    When I was 7 months pregnant with my third child, I started to notice some difficulty writing. The letters were crowded and small, and my fingers felt weak. My first thoughts were, “Was this pregnancy related? Maybe water retention was making my fingers stiff?” “Was it carpal tunnel syndrome?” After all, I had been a data enterer for the past six years. Being a full-time working mom of two young boys, I put this symptom on the back burner and concentrated on my busy life.
    After my daughter was born, I went back to work and immediately became aware of the writing problem. I notified my boss who made arrangements for me to see a workers compensation doctor affiliated with my employer. After weeks of exams and physical therapy, there was no improvement. Over the next several months I continued to seek out answers. I consulted neurologists, rheumatologists, internal medicine specialists, and started a physical therapy program. My symptoms now included nerve and muscle pain in my wrists, elbow and shoulder on my right side. I was told I had everything from tendonitis to lupus. My neurologist at the time agreed to put me on temporary disability from my job while I tried to get an answer that made sense.
    Finally one doctor suggested I make an appointment with the neurology department at UCLA for a consultation. After two and a half years of frustration, I was diagnosed in less than 15 minutes with early onset Parkinson’s disease. I had an answer, but what did this all mean? I drove home in tears wondering how I was going to break the news to my husband and mother.
    Now looking back, 8 years later, I am in a much different place. After going through bouts of depression, experimenting with a variety of prescription drugs, and struggling with destructive side effects, I’ve connected with other PD patients, and have learned to live with something I have little control over. What I do have control over is my attitude and outlook. There are many things I can still do, although maybe in a different way. It’s still difficult to button a shirt, brush my teeth or keep up with my kids, but it’s not impossible. It would be easy to curl up in a ball and feel sorry for myself but that would be giving up. I’m a mom, a daughter, a sister, and a friend, and there are people who love me and depend on me. I've got a life to live.

    Tuesday, March 20, 2012

    About Parkinson's Disease


    Parkinson’s disease is a chronic, progressive neurological disease. It belongs to a group of conditions called motor system disorders, which are the result of the loss of dopamine-producing brain cells. Dopamine, a neurochemical that controls communication between brain cells, is responsible for control of motor function. Nearly 80 percent of the dopamine producing cells in the brain die before the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease even appear. The four primary symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are tremor, or trembling in hands, arms, legs, jaw, and face; rigidity, or stiffness of the limbs and trunk; bradykinesia, or slowness of movement; and postural instability, or impaired balance and coordination. Other symptoms may include cognitive changes; difficulty in swallowing, chewing, and speaking; urinary problems or constipation; skin problems; and sleep disruptions. As these symptoms become more pronounced, patients may have difficulty walking, talking, or completing other simple tasks. Early symptoms of Parkinson’s are subtle and occur gradually. In some people the disease progresses more quickly than in others.

    Currently there is no cure, therapy, or drug to slow or halt the progression of Parkinson’s disease. While medication masks some symptoms for a limited period, generally four to eight years, dose-limiting side-effects do occur after time. Eventually the medications lose their effectiveness, leaving the person unable to move, speak or swallow.

    In 1817, a British scientist named James Parkinson first described “the shaking palsy” in an essay. It was through this essay that he defined what we know as Parkinson’s disease today: “involuntary tremulous motion, with lessened muscular power, in parts not in action and even when supported; with a propensity to bend the trunk forwards, and to pass from a walking to a running pace: the senses and intellects being uninjured.”

    It is unknown exactly how many Americans live with Parkinson’s disease, but most estimates range from 500,000 to 1.5 million. It is believed that nearly 60,000 people are diagnosed each year in the U.S. with Parkinson’s. The average age of diagnosis for Parkinson’s disease is 60 years old, but people as young as 18 have been diagnosed. Typically, anyone diagnosed under the age of 50 is considered as having young-onset Parkinson’s disease.

    The cause of Parkinson’s disease remains unknown, but scientists and researchers believe there to be both genetic and environmental factors. In October 2003, scientists at NIH discovered that too much of the alpha-synuclein gene may cause Parkinson’s disease. More recently, scientists at the University of California at Los Angeles discovered that some pesticides used on plants and crops that end up in well water are linked to an increased risk of Parkinson’s disease. The environmental and genetic links to Parkinson’s disease are diverse, but the science continues to progress.

    In order to establish better numbers and understanding about people with Parkinson’s, Congress has taken up a bill, H.R. 2595/S. 425, the National Neurological Diseases Surveillance System Act, that will create national, coordinated registries for both Parkinson’s disease and all neurological disorders. When the registry is implemented, we will learn important information about Parkinson’s disease such as geographic prevalence, disease clusters, and the number of Americans living with Parkinson’s disease.

    PAN continues to fight for better treatments and a cure for Parkinson’s disease. Click here to learn more about PAN’s legislative priorities for the Parkinson’s disease community.

    Monday, March 19, 2012

    PD is like Golf
    It’s been nearly two years, but it feels like yesterday when the doctor told me I have Parkinson’s disease (PD). My First worry was what it would mean to my family. Then, of course I was concerned...
    Open Doors
    Parkinson’s has changed my life. I’m fifty years old, diagnosed in 2005. Insecurity, reluctance and a need for education felt like a whirlwind of uncertainty at the beginning of this journey...
    Just Keep on Keeping On
    Muhammad Ali, Pope John Paul II, John Baumann, Michael J. Fox. . .Wait a minute, back up a name. What do I have in common with this group of famous people? You may have guessed it. The answer...
    New Hobbies
    I was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease almost exactly 5 years ago. I am now 61. My first symptom was shaking in my right hand when I tried to do something precise like use a screwdriver. I also started...
    Life in the Slow/Slower Lane
    After a battery of tests, the diagnosis was Parkinson’s disease. I’d never even heard of it. A lot of other people have said that too. A chronic, progressive disease with no cure...
    Surely you can step twice in the same “river” …but
    “You should go,” my brother said “You have Parkinson’s. If you don’t go now, you may never get to go.” My other siblings often asked why I have not gone back to Vietnam...
    Secret recipe behind the mask
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTpu_zBvDME I often smiled when I watched the video recording of my kick-boxing exercise which I uploaded to You Tube. My trainers and videographer told me the same thing...
    The Unwanted Visitor
    "I'm sorry. You have Parkinson's Disease." I stood in the parking lot, the receipt flapping in my trembling hand, completely stunned by the words I had just heard. At least my neurologist had...
    Tomorrow’s joy is fostered by today’s acceptance.
    Heavy duty thinking for such an early hour. Here it is 3:30A.M; the time when I awaken...my special time. Parkinson’s has been my cunning partner since 1995 when I was 49 years old. It has changed...
    Sharing Hope In Parkinson’s
    My mother was my hero in so many ways! She accepted and dealt with Parkinson’s disease with dignity and humor. She never complained about what she couldn’t do, but was grateful for what

    Sunday, March 18, 2012

    The words “you have Parkinson’s” have changed your life. For some of you, it is fresh, raw and startling news—often poorly told. Others may have grown more accustomed over the years. Some of you have loving support of friends and family. Others may feel very alone. For everyone who hears those words, life is forever changed.

    Parkinson’s is an extremely individual syndrome. And you have a great deal of power to decide how your life will unfold. Yes, it is still possible to live your best life

    Saturday, March 10, 2012

    parkinson disease

    About Parkinson's Disease


    Parkinson’s disease is a chronic, progressive neurological disease. It belongs to a group of conditions called motor system disorders, which are the result of the loss of dopamine-producing brain cells. Dopamine, a neurochemical that controls communication between brain cells, is responsible for control of motor function. Nearly 80 percent of the dopamine producing cells in the brain die before the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease even appear. The four primary symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are tremor, or trembling in hands, arms, legs, jaw, and face; rigidity, or stiffness of the limbs and trunk; bradykinesia, or slowness of movement; and postural instability, or impaired balance and coordination. Other symptoms may include cognitive changes; difficulty in swallowing, chewing, and speaking; urinary problems or constipation; skin problems; and sleep disruptions. As these symptoms become more pronounced, patients may have difficulty walking, talking, or completing other simple tasks. Early symptoms of Parkinson’s are subtle and occur gradually. In some people the disease progresses more quickly than in others.

    Currently there is no cure, therapy, or drug to slow or halt the progression of Parkinson’s disease. While medication masks some symptoms for a limited period, generally four to eight years, dose-limiting side-effects do occur after time. Eventually the medications lose their effectiveness, leaving the person unable to move, speak or swallow.

    In 1817, a British scientist named James Parkinson first described “the shaking palsy” in an essay. It was through this essay that he defined what we know as Parkinson’s disease today: “involuntary tremulous motion, with lessened muscular power, in parts not in action and even when supported; with a propensity to bend the trunk forwards, and to pass from a walking to a running pace: the senses and intellects being uninjured.”

    It is unknown exactly how many Americans live with Parkinson’s disease, but most estimates range from 500,000 to 1.5 million. It is believed that nearly 60,000 people are diagnosed each year in the U.S. with Parkinson’s. The average age of diagnosis for Parkinson’s disease is 60 years old, but people as young as 18 have been diagnosed. Typically, anyone diagnosed under the age of 50 is considered as having young-onset Parkinson’s disease.

    The cause of Parkinson’s disease remains unknown, but scientists and researchers believe there to be both genetic and environmental factors. In October 2003, scientists at NIH discovered that too much of the alpha-synuclein gene may cause Parkinson’s disease. More recently, scientists at the University of California at Los Angeles discovered that some pesticides used on plants and crops that end up in well water are linked to an increased risk of Parkinson’s disease. The environmental and genetic links to Parkinson’s disease are diverse, but the science continues to progress.

    In order to establish better numbers and understanding about people with Parkinson’s, Congress has taken up a bill, H.R. 2595/S. 425, the National Neurological Diseases Surveillance System Act, that will create national, coordinated registries for both Parkinson’s disease and all neurological disorders. When the registry is implemented, we will learn important information about Parkinson’s disease such as geographic prevalence, disease clusters, and the number of Americans living with Parkinson’s disease.

    PAN continues to fight for better treatments and a cure for Parkinson’s disease. Click here to learn more about PAN’s legislative priorities for the Parkinson’s disease community.

    Wednesday, March 7, 2012

    secret recipe behind the mAK

    Secret recipe behind the mask

    Secret recipe behind the mask
    Hero Teo
    Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTpu_zBvDME
    I often smiled when I watched the video recording of my kick-boxing exercise which I uploaded to You Tube. My trainers and videographer told me the same thing – “You do not look like a Parkinson’s patient at all”. Even my doctor shook his head in disbelief and said, “This is shocking. I can’t imagine a 70-year-old Parkinson’s patient doing a very strenuous exercise such as kickboxing. I am sure that you are the only Parkinson’s patient in Malaysia who is doing the kickboxing exercise.”
    As early as 1998, I already had both the motor and non-motor symptoms. Since my diagnosis in 2002, I went through a period of depression, anxiety, denial and anger. Subsequently, I bounced back after discovering a secret recipe for fighting Parkinson’s, which consisted of: knowledge (is power), exercise, medications, nutrition / supplements and prayer. In my quest for knowledge, I surfed various Parkinson’s websites, raining them with questions, questions and questions. I even started the first Parkinson’s blog in Malaysia (www.heroteo.com). I tried to learn everything about Parkinson’s in order to overcome all complications - the Chinese heroes won the battles by understanding their enemy first.
    Animal experiments showed that exercise may be neuroprotective. Rats which were forced to exercise had a lesser degree of brain damage after they were exposed to poison. In mice which were made to undergo treadmill exercise, there was increased production of dopamine.
    Parkinson’s patients are comparable to the car. The medications are needed to help patients to start walking, while fuel or battery is needed to help start the car engine. Exercise is needed to improve the patients’ physical mobility and endurance, while driving helps to recharge the battery. Thus, exercise helps our “engines” warm up before leaving home and keep the “cars” going everyday. Even healthy people such as Bruce Lee, the Chinese Kung Fu master, know that exercise is beneficial.
    As such, since 2005, I decided to “get physical”. I spend 3-4 hours everyday at the California Fitness gym, doing a wide range of “heavy” exercise such as kick-boxing, weight-training and spinning (indoor cycling). Twice a week, I do yoga exercise at home with the guidance of a trainer.
    Since this year, my physical condition has drastically improved. I sleep and eat well (I eat to live, and live to eat). I enjoy driving around the Kuala Lumpur city with my wife everyday and going overseas for holiday. I managed to reduce the daily dose of Parkinson’s medications recently. Sometimes, I wonder whether I am just a “normal person” behind the mask.
    I know that it is technically difficult to prove that exercise has neuroprotective effect in Parkinson’s patients. Despite this, I believe that exercise has slowed down my disease progression. I hope that my video recording will bring hope and happiness to all Parkinson’s patients in this world, by reminding them that they can still live a physically active life.

    Monday, March 5, 2012

    Monday, February 20, 2012

    muscles practice and saliva

    There are suggestion that Lip muscle,tongue muscle and swallow practice are benefical than the medication taking without sideeffect Kindly elaborted to help the PD patients aware the diseases and encourage to set up support groups to educate the patients and their immediate families 0
    ReportBack to top of the page up there ^ MultiQuote Reply Edit
    I will post this for you. Michael S. Okun, M.D.National Medical Director NPFUF Center for Movement Disorders & NeurorestorationRead More about Dr. Okun at: mdc.mbi

    Thursday, February 16, 2012

    tremor

    Dear Forum members here are a few facts on Parkinson's tremor:Tremor in Parkinson's disease is usually a resting tremor, that improves when performing tasks.Most PD patients have some intentional tremor (tremor at action), but it is usually minor in severity.A very small number of PD patients have co-existent essential tremor.Treatment for PD tremor is usually sinemet (levodopa), a dopamine agonist, or in rare cases an anticholinergic. Anticholinergics are usually avoided because of side effects, but can be useful in difficult to treat tremor.Once patients have tried maximally tolerated doses of sinemet, a dopamine agonist, and an anticholinergics---in a cocktail--if they still have bothersome tremor, many patients will try clozaril (which requires weekly blood monitoring), or deep brain stimulation as a treatment approach.20-40% of patients with PD have a tremor that responds only partially to medications, and in rare cases some tremors do not respond to medications

    Monday, February 13, 2012

    Tai Chi

    Mild-to-moderate Parkinson's disease patients who practice
    Tai Chi were found to experience significant benefits, including better posture,
    fewer falls, and improved walking ability, researchers from the Oregon Research
    Institute (ORI) reported in NEJM (New England Journal of Medicine). The
    authors added that Tai Chi was superior for the Parkinson's patients than
    stretching or resistance training regarding several symptoms related to the
    disease.An individual with Parkinson's disease whose movements are
    impaired, especially when standing balance is undermined, finds it considerably
    harder to function in everyday life events and chores; their quality of life is
    severely affected. As the disease progresses, balance becomes more of a problem,
    and subsequently, so does walking.Experts say that physical activity,
    i.e. exercise, helps slow down the deterioration of motor function, and allows
    the patient to function for longer independently. The authors added, however,
    that studies on the benefits of alternative exercises, such as Tai Chi, which
    were thought to improve function, gait and balance in those with PD (Parkinson's
    disease), have been very few and limited.Study leader, Fuzhong Li,
    Ph.D., said:
    "These results are clinically significant because they suggest that
    Tai Chi, a low-to-moderate impact exercise, may be used, as an add-on to current
    physical therapies, to address some of the key clinical problems in Parkinson's
    disease, such as postural and gait instability.Since many training
    features in the program are functionally oriented, the improvements in the
    balance and gait measures that we demonstrated highlight the potential of Tai
    Chi-based movements in rehabilitating patients with these types of problems and,
    consequently, easing cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease and improving
    mobility, flexibility, balance, and range of motion."Dr. Li
    and team randomly divided 195 participants, all with Parkinson's, into three
    groups:
    The Tai Chi Group
    The Stretching Group
    The Resistance Training Group

    Tuesday, January 31, 2012

    Parkinson disease

    Parkinson’s disease is a disorder that affects nerve cells, or neurons, in a part of the brain that controls muscle movement. In Parkinson’s, neurons that make a chemical called dopamine die or do not work properly. Dopamine normally sends signals that help coordinate your movements. No one knows what damages these cells. Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease may includeTrembling of hands, arms, legs, jaw and faceStiffness of the arms, legs and trunkSlowness of movementPoor balance and coordinationAs symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking or doing simple tasks. They may also have problems such as depression, sleep problems or trouble chewing, swallowing or speaking.Parkinson’s usually begins around age 60, but it can start earlier. It is more common in men than in women. There is no cure for Parkinson’s disease. A variety of medicines sometimes help symptomsNo Comments »

    Monday, January 30, 2012

    Eating right goes a long way when it comes to a healthy heart.According to the Ministry of Health, Ischaemic Heart Disease accounts for 18.7 per cent of deaths in Singapore in 2010. It is Singapore's number two killer just after cancer.A heart attack occurs when blood flow to part of the heart is blocked causing poor supply of oxygen to the heart muscles. Some people have chest pains when heart attack happens but some people have no symptoms at all.


    It is important to be aware of the risks of heart attack because most of them are preventable.About.com reported that dietary advice for reducing heart disease risk includes eating a balanced diet with less saturated fats from red meats, more fresh fruits and vegetables, more fish, less sugar, more fiber and for many people, fewer total calories. Try having these

    Saturday, January 28, 2012

    These are 15 I will follow myself in 2012, and hopefully beyond. I invite you to join me on these "Rules." Zi think it would make the world a better place.1- Be Truthful to yourself and others. Yes, it is not politically correct. Does a true friend just tell you whats good about you? Friendship begins with honesty to yourself and others. Trust me, honesty will bring closeness and respect. So, wear the same face all the time because truthfully, you can never fool your friends.2- Go through your list of contacts or address book. If you have not communicated in ANY way with that contact in the past year....erase them. Yes, even if it is me. Unless it is a plumber, mechanic, lawyer, etc... Start the year by surrounding yourself with good people with good intentions. "Give and take" does not mean, "I give and you take." If someone is not putting as much into your relationship as you are, then they are taking a piece of you that someone else may need. If you do this, you will be amazed at how few people are in your contact list. Those are your friends.3- TALK, Do Not Text important issues. An "I'm sorry" or "Please forgive me" text has no feeling because you can not see the person's face. An occassional "I love you" or "I miss You" is ok. The serious matters you must take care of in person. Along with this, do not text someone while you are having a conversation with others. Be polite with the phone. Hang it up when your in line at the store, do not text at the dinner table, when face to face with friends or family, etc....COMMUNICATION is what sets us apart from animals (that and opposable thumbs.) Show respect to the person to whom you are face-to-face with. It will go a long way. Plus, while texting you may miss some very important things in life you can not get back. It can be lonely with no one to talk to.4- Do just one good deed for a stranger or a surprise for a loved one. It can be as simple as holding the door for someone, writing "I love you" on a napkin and putting it in their lunch, or just saying "I like that shirt" to someone who looks "down in the dumps" at the store. Just like road rage, kindness is contageous.5- Always end a phone call, family gathering, gathering with friends, etc..with, "I love you." You may never get the chance again.6- Charity is not always about money. At least once in this upcoming year, do something nice for someone less fortunate. It can be a "Red Kettle" donation or, it can be gathering stuff around the house and donate it, it can be delivering a meal to a neighbor, cutting the grass or shoveling snow, it can be donating time to a homeless shelter, volunteering at a school or library, or it can be just listening to someone who has an issue. I am not saying, "Don't donate money (a good choice may be www.parkinson.org--shameless plug)," but there are other options. You have 525,600 minutes in one year. I think we can all spare 15 to 30 minutes to help those in need.7- Hug your children and tell them you love them many times a day. I always ask my girls, "Are you beautiful? Are you smart?" If they answer "No" to either question, or even delay to answer, we talk about it until it is resolved. There is nothing more important than having your children know they are loved, beautiful/handsome, and smart.8- Forgive and try to forget. If you dwell on the past you will never move forward. Forgive those people and things that you need to in order to move forward. When you forgive, you let go of the past, and forgetting will go with it.9- Money is never made, it is only transferred. People rarely get rich working. Some people just make more money than you, but remember they also spend more than you. You work for a company, they transfer the money money they make to you for the work you have done. You, in turn, transfer it to the bank, the mortage company, the auto loan company, the cable company, the gas company, the electric company, etc... When you look at what you owe, you say to yourself, "How do I get out of this?" The United States National Debt is, as of 1/1/2012, $15,125,898,976,398. You do not see our government sweating. If you owe money, call up the companies and tell them you are having trouble paying them. Don't ignore them, they won't go away.10- Try something you have never done before. It does not matter what, just as ling as it is something you have NEVER done before. 12- Keep your change! I have never been a person to search my pocket for 26 cents when my soda cost $1.26. I always give $2.00 and keep the chsnge, even though I know I have it in my pocket. At the end of the day put all the change in a bucket. If you start today, you WILL NOT have to worry about money for Chritmas presents 360 days from now. Trust me on this, it adds up.13- "The 3 Bucket Rule. If you have children, do this with them. If you don't have children, then do it for your grandchildren or even yourself. Use 3 cans, or boxes, or whatever will hold money. Let your kuds decorate the boxes. On Box 1 write "ME," on Box 2 write "BANK," and on Box 3 write "CHARITY." Each week give your kids an allowance (say $3.00). I know many of you are saying that your kids don't do anything for an allowance. Let me ask you this, "Do you get paid per hour or by how much you do, how fast you are, or how neat your work space is?" I think I proved my point and kids should be treated the same. So, every week you give them $3.00. $1 goes into the ME bucket, which they can spend at any time on what they want. $1 goes into the BANK bucket, which you take them to the bank and open an account for them and they put the book in the bucket when they get home (some banks have kids accounts, just ask). $1 goes into the CHARITY bucket, which at the end of each year they get to pick out what charity they want to donate to. This will give your children the life values of: Spend Wisely, Save Accordingly, and Give Back to those in need. 14- Call your family once a week. I have not been very good at this, but this us the year. Your family is always there for you, whether it be Mom, Dad, Bother, Sister, etc... One of them must like you. Call them.15- "Choose to have a great Day! I say this to my wife and our girls every morning before they go to school. It is a choice, and DO NOT let anyone stand in the way of your choice to HAVE A GREAT DAY!I truly care for the well being of all of you deeply, and may this year be your year. It starts today, don't waste 1 minute of the 525,600 minutes you have this year.Your Friend & Phsrmacist,Mark Best of health,Mark R. Comes R.Ph."Ask The Pharmacist"www.parkinson.org 0
    ReportBack to top of the page up there ^ MultiQuote Reply

    Friday, January 27, 2012

    15 rules

    Posted 02 January 2012 - 01:11 PMThese are 15 I will follow myself in 2012, and hopefully beyond. I invite you to join me on these "Rules." Zi think it would make the world a better place.1- Be Truthful to yourself and others. Yes, it is not politically correct. Does a true friend just tell you whats good about you? Friendship begins with honesty to yourself and others. Trust me, honesty will bring closeness and respect. So, wear the same face all the time because truthfully, you can never fool your friends.2- Go through your list of contacts or address book. If you have not communicated in ANY way with that contact in the past year....erase them. Yes, even if it is me. Unless it is a plumber, mechanic, lawyer, etc... Start the year by surrounding yourself with good people with good intentions. "Give and take" does not mean, "I give and you take." If someone is not putting as much into your relationship as you are, then they are taking a piece of you that someone else may need. If you do this, you will be amazed at how few people are in your contact list. Those are your friends.3- TALK, Do Not Text important issues. An "I'm sorry" or "Please forgive me" text has no feeling because you can not see the person's face. An occassional "I love you" or "I miss You" is ok. The serious matters you must take care of in person. Along with this, do not text someone while you are having a conversation with others. Be polite with the phone. Hang it up when your in line at the store, do not text at the dinner table, when face to face with friends or family, etc....COMMUNICATION is what sets us apart from animals (that and opposable thumbs.) Show respect to the person to whom you are face-to-face with. It will go a long way. Plus, while texting you may miss some very important things in life you can not get back. It can be lonely with no one to talk to.4- Do just one good deed for a stranger or a surprise for a loved one. It can be as simple as holding the door for someone, writing "I love you" on a napkin and putting it in their lunch, or just saying "I like that shirt" to someone who looks "down in the dumps" at the store. Just like road rage, kindness is contageous.5- Always end a phone call, family gathering, gathering with friends, etc..with, "I love you." You may never get the chance again.6- Charity is not always about money. At least once in this upcoming year, do something nice for someone less fortunate. It can be a "Red Kettle" donation or, it can be gathering stuff around the house and donate it, it can be delivering a meal to a neighbor, cutting the grass or shoveling snow, it can be donating time to a homeless shelter, volunteering at a school or library, or it can be just listening to someone who has an issue. I am not saying, "Don't donate money (a good choice may be www.parkinson.org--shameless plug)," but there are other options. You have 525,600 minutes in one year. I think we can all spare 15 to 30 minutes to help those in need.7- Hug your children and tell them you love them many times a day. I always ask my girls, "Are you beautiful? Are you smart?" If they answer "No" to either question, or even delay to answer, we talk about it until it is resolved. There is nothing more important than having your children know they are loved, beautiful/handsome, and smart.8- Forgive and try to forget. If you dwell on the past you will never move forward. Forgive those people and things that you need to in order to move forward. When you forgive, you let go of the past, and forgetting will go with it.10- Try something you have never done before. It does not matter what, just as ling as it is something you have NEVER done before. 12- Keep your change! I have never been a person to search my pocket for 26 cents when my soda cost $1.26. I always give $2.00 and keep the chsnge, even though I know I have it in my pocket. At the end of the day put all the change in a bucket. If you start today, you WILL NOT have to worry about money for Chritmas presents 360 days from now. Trust me on this, it adds up.13- "The 3 Bucket Rule. If you have children, do this with them. If you don't have children, then do it for your grandchildren or even yourself. Use 3 cans, or boxes, or whatever will hold money. Let your kuds decorate the boxes. On Box 1 write "ME," on Box 2 write "BANK," and on Box 3 write "CHARITY." Each week give your kids an allowance (say $3.00). I know many of you are saying that your kids don't do anything for an allowance. Let me ask you this, "Do you get paid per hour or by how much you do, how fast you are, or how neat your work space is?" I think I proved my point and kids should be treated the same. So, every week you give them $3.00. $1 goes into the ME bucket, which they can spend at any time on what they want. $1 goes into the BANK bucket, which you take them to the bank and open an account for them and they put the book in the bucket when they get home (some banks have kids accounts, just ask). $1 goes into the CHARITY bucket, which at the end of each year they get to pick out what charity they want to donate to. This will give your children the life values of: Spend Wisely, Save Accordingly, and Give Back to those in need. 14- Call your family once a week. I have not been very good at this, but this us the year. Your family is always there for you, whether it be Mom, Dad, Bother, Sister, etc... One of them must like you. Call them.15- "Choose to have a great Day! I say this to my wife and our girls every morning before they go to school. It is a choice, and DO NOT let anyone stand in the way of your choice to HAVE A GREAT DAY!I truly care for the well being of all of you deeply, and may this year be your year. It starts today, don't waste 1 minute of the 525,600 minutes you have this year.Your Friend & Phsrmacist

    Thursday, January 26, 2012

    I am on bipolar medication for a yearMy medication ; one 1/2 tablets Arip at lunch,night dailyone Zoloft 50mg at night daily1/2 Zydis (olanzapine) nightly1 Stilnox 10mg nightly2 tablet 0.5 Besquil three times dailyParkinson medication6mg requip pd 24 hours daily1 tablet 25/100 daily1 tablet Stalevo 150/37.5/200mg dailyI do not have sleep trouble nightlybut with anxiety, slurred and saliva during day timeKindly advice TEOKIMHOE

    Friday, January 20, 2012

    What is Drug Interaction?Medicines are used to treat certain conditions or illnesses, but when two or more medicines are used simultaneously, they may interact with each other and cause complications or unwanted side effects. Drug interactions may occur with prescription drugs, over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, herbal remedies, or dietary supplements, so it is important that the patient realizes the dangers of mixing drugs without consulting a doctor.Parkinson’s Disease MedicinesThe drug therapy most commonly used in Parkinson’s disease usually consists of the following : LevodopaLevodopa + peripheral decarboxylase inhibitors such as carbidopa and benserazide.Dopamine receptor agonists – pramipexole, ropinirole, and rotigotine.MAO-B inhibitors – selegiline and rasagiline.COMT inhibitors – entacaponeAnticholinergics – benzhexol and orphenadrineAmantadine.Drug Interactions with Parkinson’s Disease MedicinesLevodopaSince this is the most widely used medicine in Parkinson’s disease, its drug interactions should be understood by all Parkinson’s patients. Certain medicines decrease effectiveness of levodopa hence the dose of levodopa may have to be adjusted if used together. These include Anticholinergics – sometimes used in addition to levodopa for treatment of symptoms in Parkinson’s disease. Over-the-counter cough and cold medicines contain anticholinergics such as diphenhydramine, chlorpheniramine, and phenylephrine. Antispasmodics used for treating stomach or uterine cramps also contain anticholinergics such as dicyclomine and hyoscyamine. Anti-allergic medicines (like

    Parkinson disease

    Parkinson’s disease is a long term disease where the patient needs to take medicines on a regular basis for relief of the symptoms> It is important for both the Parkinson’s patient and care givers to realize that these medicines might have various types of interactions with other drugs. Some of these drug interactions can be quite severe, therefore additional medicines should be taken only after consulting a doctor.

    other drug interaction with PD medicines

    Other Drug Interactions with Parkinson’s Disease Medicines
    Posted: by Dr. P.D. Tags: , ,
    Table of Contents
    What is Drug Interaction?
    Parkinson’s Disease Medicines
    Drug Interactions with Parkinson’s Disease Medicines
    Levodopa
    Other Parkinson’s Drugs
    Comments (7)
    Parkinson’s disease is a long term disease where the patient needs to take medicines on a regular basis for relief of the symptoms> It is important for both the Parkinson’s patient and care givers to realize that these medicines might have various types of interactions with other drugs. Some of these drug interactions can be quite severe, therefore additional medicines should be taken only after consulting a doctor

    Friday, January 13, 2012

    saliva

    Drooling and Excess Saliva in Parkinson's Disease
    From , former About.com Guide
    Updated May 19, 2009
    About.com Health's Disease and Condition content is reviewed by the Medical Review Board
    See More About:
    parkinson's treatments
    parkinson's symptoms
    If you have Parkinson's disease you have probably learned to carry around a handkerchief in your pocket so that you can periodically wipe up the spit that seems to regularly leak out of your mouth. Survey studies have recorded the presence of excess saliva or drooling in 70 to 78% of patients with PD. Men drool more than women and it appears to be more embarrassing for men than for women.
    Why All the Excess Saliva in Parkinson's Disease?
    Scientists have found that the problem is not one of over-production but one of inefficient and infrequent swallowing. In fact, saliva production in PD is typically diminished over normal levels. Persons with PD simply do not swallow as much as other people.
    So What Can Be Done?
    There are several drug treatments available. Potent drugs knonw as anticholinergics, such as trihexyphenidyl hydrochloride and benzatropine mesilate, are prescribed in an attempt to “dry up” the excess saliva. But this class of drugs often creates troublesome side effects such as constipation, urinary retention, memory impairment, confusion, and even hallucinations, particularly in elderly individuals. Another possibility is to take a drop of 1% atropine ophthalmic solution under the tongue twice daily but this has been tried in only a handful of patients. Injections of botulinum toxin A have also been used to try to eradicate excessive saliva in PD. Although this drug is effective for some people with PD, side effects are again an issue including an excessively dry mouth and dysphagia or trouble swallowing food.